Survival of Zirconia Crowns in Primary Maxillary Incisors at 12-, 24- and 36-Month Follow-Up

Ana Lucia Seminario, Mariella Garcia, Charles Spiekerman, Poojashree Rajanbabu, Kevin J. Donly, Peter Harbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the survival probability of zirconia crowns (ZCs) on primary maxillary incisors placed in children diagnosed with severe early childhood caries at 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-up visits in a university pediatric dental clinic. Methods: Ninety-four teeth in 30 healthy 24- to 60-month-olds who received ZCs under general anesthesia participated in this study (N equals 94). Data included children's demographics, dental-related variables, appointment dates, survival of crown, and type of failure (defined as replacement of lost ZCs or extraction of the treated tooth due to evidence of apical periodontitis prior to natural exfoliation). Descriptive statistics were performed to examine demographics, while Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate survival probabilities of ZCs over time. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) from Cox proportional hazard regression with robust standard errors were used to compare risk of ZC failure by patient and tooth characteristics. Results: The overall survival probabilities for ZCs at 12, 24, and 36 months were 93 percent, 85 percent, and 76 percent, respectively. Conclusion: With esthetic characteristics and high survival probabilities, zirconia crowns present as a suitable alternative for reconstruction of primary maxillary incisors in young children. (Pediatr Dent 2019;41(5):385-90).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-390
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric dentistry
Volume41
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 15 2019

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Seminario, A. L., Garcia, M., Spiekerman, C., Rajanbabu, P., Donly, K. J., & Harbert, P. (2019). Survival of Zirconia Crowns in Primary Maxillary Incisors at 12-, 24- and 36-Month Follow-Up. Pediatric dentistry, 41(5), 385-390.