Survival improvements in adolescents and young adults after myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for acute lymphoblastic Leukemia

William A. Wood, Stephanie J. Lee, Ruta Brazauskas, Zhiwei Wang, Mahmoud D. Aljurf, Karen K. Ballen, David K. Buchbinder, Jason Dehn, Cesar O. Freytes, Hillard M. Lazarus, Charles F. LeMaistre, Paulette Mehta, David Szwajcer, Steven Joffe, Navneet S. Majhail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15 to 40 years) with cancer have not experienced survival improvements to the same extent as younger and older patients. We compared changes in survival after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children (n = 981), AYAs (n = 1218), and older adults (n = 469) who underwent transplantation over 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995, 1996 to 2001, and 2002 to 2007. Five-year survival varied inversely with age group. Survival improved over time in AYAs and paralleled that seen in children; however, overall survival did not change over time for older adults. Survival improvements were primarily related to lower rates of early treatment-related mortality in the most recent era. For all cohorts, relapse rates did not change over time. A subset of 222 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 25 at 46 pediatric or 49 adult centers were also analyzed to describe differences by center type. In this subgroup, there were differences in transplantation practices among pediatric and adult centers, although HCT outcomes did not differ by center type. Survival for AYAs undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HCT for ALL improved at a similar rate as survival for children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)829-836
Number of pages8
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Adolescent and young adults
  • Allogeneic
  • Hematopoietic cell transplantation
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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