Surgically managed stage i endometrial cancer in a low-volume center: Outcomes and complications in a military residency program

Beverly G. Reed, William J. Lowery, Erin A. Keyser, Edward R. Kost, Michael J. Sundborg, William E. Winter, Cristy Landt, Charles A. Leath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare operative outcomes and complications for patients with endometrial cancer who underwent staging by laparoscopy vs laparotomy in a low-volume facility. STUDY DESIGN: Research was conducted with a retrospective cohort of surgical patients with clinical stage I endometrial cancer from 2004-2009. RESULTS: Eighty-six demographically similar patients (50 laparotomy and 36 laparoscopy) were identified. Laparoscopy had less estimated blood loss (339 vs 558 mL; P = .013) and lower rates of transfusion (5.6% vs 24%; P=.02). Laparoscopy was longer (281 vs 202 minutes; P ≤ .0005) but required a shorter hospital stay (2.2 vs 5.5 days; P < .0005). Laparoscopy patients had fewer overall complications (16.7% vs 32%; P = .11). No differences in final surgical stage or lymph node yields between the groups were present. CONCLUSION: Although a longer procedure, laparoscopy had fewer complications and shorter hospital stays. Prolonged operative time, compared with published experience, is potentially the result of unique factors in our center.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)356.e1-356.e5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume205
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Endometrial cancer
  • Laparoscopy
  • Laparotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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