Surgical resection and amniotic membrane transplantation for treatment of refractory giant papillae in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

Ping Guo, Ahmad Kheirkhah, Wei Wei Zhou, Lei Qin, Xiao Li Shen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of surgical resection and amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for treatment of refractory symptomatic giant papillae in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 13 eyes of 9 patients with refractory giant papillae associated with corneal shield ulcer and/or punctate epithelial erosions who underwent surgical resection of the papillae combined with AMT to cover the tarsal conjunctival defect. Results: During 14.2 ± 4.2 months of postoperative follow-up, smooth tarsal conjunctival surface was achieved in all cases, with no recurrence of the giant papillae in any eye. Corneal shield ulcers and punctate epithelial erosions healed within 2 weeks after surgery and did not recur during the follow-up. Best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.26 ± 0.21 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution preoperatively to 0.02 ± 0.04 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution postoperatively (P = 0.01). Three patients experienced recurrence of VKC symptoms, but without giant papillae, which could be well controlled by topical medications. Conclusions: Surgical resection combined with AMT is an effective procedure for treatment of refractory giant papillae in patients with VKC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)816-820
Number of pages5
JournalCornea
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amniotic membrane transplantation
  • Corneal shield ulcer
  • Giant papillae
  • Vernal keratoconjunctivitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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