Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer's disease in the community

Matthew P. Pase, Jayandra J. Himali, Paul F. Jacques, Charles DeCarli, Claudia L. Satizabal, Hugo Aparicio, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Alexa S. Beiser, Sudha Seshadri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Excess sugar consumption has been linked with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in animal models. Methods We examined the cross-sectional association of sugary beverage consumption with neuropsychological (N = 4276) and magnetic resonance imaging (N = 3846) markers of preclinical Alzheimer's disease and vascular brain injury (VBI) in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Intake of sugary beverages was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Results Relative to consuming less than one sugary beverage per day, higher intake of sugary beverages was associated with lower total brain volume (1–2/day, β ± standard error [SE] = −0.55 ± 0.14 mean percent difference, P =.0002; >2/day, β ± SE = −0.68 ± 0.18, P <.0001), and poorer performance on tests of episodic memory (all P <.01). Daily fruit juice intake was associated with lower total brain volume, hippocampal volume, and poorer episodic memory (all P <.05). Sugary beverage intake was not associated with VBI in a consistent manner across outcomes. Discussion Higher intake of sugary beverages was associated cross-sectionally with markers of preclinical AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-964
Number of pages10
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia
  • Diet
  • Framingham Heart Study
  • Sugar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer's disease in the community'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this