Stuttering, induced fluency, and natural fluency: A hierarchical series of activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses

Kristin S. Budde, Daniel S. Barron, Peter T Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder most likely due to a heritable form of developmental dysmyelination impairing the function of the speech-motor system. Speech-induced brain-activation patterns in persons who stutter (PWS) are anomalous in various ways; the consistency of these aberrant patterns is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, we present a hierarchical series of coordinate-based meta-analyses addressing this issue. Two tiers of meta-analyses were performed on a 17-paper dataset (202 PWS; 167 fluent controls). Four large-scale (top-tier) meta-analyses were performed, two for each subject group (PWS and controls). These analyses robustly confirmed the regional effects previously postulated as "neural signatures of stuttering" (Brown, Ingham, Ingham, Laird, & Fox, 2005) and extended this designation to additional regions. Two smaller-scale (lower-tier) meta-analyses refined the interpretation of the large-scale analyses: (1) a between-group contrast targeting differences between PWS and controls (stuttering trait); and (2) a within-group contrast (PWS only) of stuttering with induced fluency (stuttering state).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-107
Number of pages9
JournalBrain and Language
Volume139
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Stuttering
activation
Meta-Analysis
human being
Speech Disorders
Group
speech disorder
brain
Fluency
Activation
Person
Stutter
interpretation
Brain

Keywords

  • Activation likelihood estimation
  • ALE
  • Functional neuroimaging
  • Meta-analysis
  • Persistent developmental stuttering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Stuttering, induced fluency, and natural fluency : A hierarchical series of activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses. / Budde, Kristin S.; Barron, Daniel S.; Fox, Peter T.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 139, 01.12.2014, p. 99-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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