Structural imaging biomarkers for bipolar disorder

Meta-analyses of whole-brain voxel-based morphometry studies

Xin Lu, Yuan Zhong, Zijuan Ma, Yun Wu, Peter T Fox, Ning Zhang, Chun Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and destructive psychiatric illness worldwide. Although it is known that BD is associated with morphological abnormalities of the brain, the regions implicated in BD remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to update current knowledge on potential structural imaging biomarkers of BD. Methods: Studies published up to January 31, 2018, were identified by a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, EBSCO, and BrainMap voxel-based morphometry (VBM) database. Whole-brain VBM studies that examined gray matter (GM) abnormalities of group comparisons between BD and healthy controls (HC) and reported results as coordinates in a standard reference space were included. Different meta-analyses were performed by activation likelihood estimation (ALE) algorithm. Results: A total of 46 studies with 56 experiments, including 1720 subjects and 268 foci were included. Seven different meta-analyses were calculated separately across experiments reporting decreased or increased GM volume among BD, BDΙ, BD-adults, and BD-youths groups. Fifteen regions of significantly different GM volume between four groups and HC were identified. There were extensive GM deficits in the prefrontal and temporal cortex, and enlargements in the putamen, cingulate cortex, and precuneus. Conclusions: The results revealed that the thinning of prefrontal cortex was a key region in the pathophysiology of BD. The enlargement of the cingulate cortex may be implicated in a compensatory mechanism. It underscored important differences between BD-adults and BD-youths and specific biomarkers of three subgroups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDepression and Anxiety
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bipolar Disorder
Meta-Analysis
Biomarkers
Brain
Gyrus Cinguli
Prefrontal Cortex
Parietal Lobe
Putamen
Temporal Lobe
PubMed
Psychiatry
Databases
Control Groups

Keywords

  • bipolar disorder
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • meta-analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Structural imaging biomarkers for bipolar disorder : Meta-analyses of whole-brain voxel-based morphometry studies. / Lu, Xin; Zhong, Yuan; Ma, Zijuan; Wu, Yun; Fox, Peter T; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Chun.

In: Depression and Anxiety, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a599d700ab744ed09ae6d7c66a419ffd,
title = "Structural imaging biomarkers for bipolar disorder: Meta-analyses of whole-brain voxel-based morphometry studies",
abstract = "Background: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and destructive psychiatric illness worldwide. Although it is known that BD is associated with morphological abnormalities of the brain, the regions implicated in BD remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to update current knowledge on potential structural imaging biomarkers of BD. Methods: Studies published up to January 31, 2018, were identified by a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, EBSCO, and BrainMap voxel-based morphometry (VBM) database. Whole-brain VBM studies that examined gray matter (GM) abnormalities of group comparisons between BD and healthy controls (HC) and reported results as coordinates in a standard reference space were included. Different meta-analyses were performed by activation likelihood estimation (ALE) algorithm. Results: A total of 46 studies with 56 experiments, including 1720 subjects and 268 foci were included. Seven different meta-analyses were calculated separately across experiments reporting decreased or increased GM volume among BD, BDΙ, BD-adults, and BD-youths groups. Fifteen regions of significantly different GM volume between four groups and HC were identified. There were extensive GM deficits in the prefrontal and temporal cortex, and enlargements in the putamen, cingulate cortex, and precuneus. Conclusions: The results revealed that the thinning of prefrontal cortex was a key region in the pathophysiology of BD. The enlargement of the cingulate cortex may be implicated in a compensatory mechanism. It underscored important differences between BD-adults and BD-youths and specific biomarkers of three subgroups.",
keywords = "bipolar disorder, magnetic resonance imaging, meta-analysis",
author = "Xin Lu and Yuan Zhong and Zijuan Ma and Yun Wu and Fox, {Peter T} and Ning Zhang and Chun Wang",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/da.22866",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Depression and Anxiety",
issn = "1091-4269",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structural imaging biomarkers for bipolar disorder

T2 - Meta-analyses of whole-brain voxel-based morphometry studies

AU - Lu, Xin

AU - Zhong, Yuan

AU - Ma, Zijuan

AU - Wu, Yun

AU - Fox, Peter T

AU - Zhang, Ning

AU - Wang, Chun

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and destructive psychiatric illness worldwide. Although it is known that BD is associated with morphological abnormalities of the brain, the regions implicated in BD remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to update current knowledge on potential structural imaging biomarkers of BD. Methods: Studies published up to January 31, 2018, were identified by a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, EBSCO, and BrainMap voxel-based morphometry (VBM) database. Whole-brain VBM studies that examined gray matter (GM) abnormalities of group comparisons between BD and healthy controls (HC) and reported results as coordinates in a standard reference space were included. Different meta-analyses were performed by activation likelihood estimation (ALE) algorithm. Results: A total of 46 studies with 56 experiments, including 1720 subjects and 268 foci were included. Seven different meta-analyses were calculated separately across experiments reporting decreased or increased GM volume among BD, BDΙ, BD-adults, and BD-youths groups. Fifteen regions of significantly different GM volume between four groups and HC were identified. There were extensive GM deficits in the prefrontal and temporal cortex, and enlargements in the putamen, cingulate cortex, and precuneus. Conclusions: The results revealed that the thinning of prefrontal cortex was a key region in the pathophysiology of BD. The enlargement of the cingulate cortex may be implicated in a compensatory mechanism. It underscored important differences between BD-adults and BD-youths and specific biomarkers of three subgroups.

AB - Background: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and destructive psychiatric illness worldwide. Although it is known that BD is associated with morphological abnormalities of the brain, the regions implicated in BD remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to update current knowledge on potential structural imaging biomarkers of BD. Methods: Studies published up to January 31, 2018, were identified by a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, EBSCO, and BrainMap voxel-based morphometry (VBM) database. Whole-brain VBM studies that examined gray matter (GM) abnormalities of group comparisons between BD and healthy controls (HC) and reported results as coordinates in a standard reference space were included. Different meta-analyses were performed by activation likelihood estimation (ALE) algorithm. Results: A total of 46 studies with 56 experiments, including 1720 subjects and 268 foci were included. Seven different meta-analyses were calculated separately across experiments reporting decreased or increased GM volume among BD, BDΙ, BD-adults, and BD-youths groups. Fifteen regions of significantly different GM volume between four groups and HC were identified. There were extensive GM deficits in the prefrontal and temporal cortex, and enlargements in the putamen, cingulate cortex, and precuneus. Conclusions: The results revealed that the thinning of prefrontal cortex was a key region in the pathophysiology of BD. The enlargement of the cingulate cortex may be implicated in a compensatory mechanism. It underscored important differences between BD-adults and BD-youths and specific biomarkers of three subgroups.

KW - bipolar disorder

KW - magnetic resonance imaging

KW - meta-analysis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057292696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057292696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/da.22866

DO - 10.1002/da.22866

M3 - Article

JO - Depression and Anxiety

JF - Depression and Anxiety

SN - 1091-4269

ER -