Storage time and urine biomarker levels in the ASSESS-AKI study

ASSESS-AKI Study Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although stored urine samples are often used in biomarker studies focused on acute and chronic kidney disease, how storage time impacts biomarker levels is not well understood. Methods: 866 subjects enrolled in the NIDDK-sponsored ASsessment, Serial Evaluation, and Subsequent Sequelae in Acute Kidney Injury (ASSESS-AKI) Study were included. Samples were processed under standard conditions and stored at -70°C until analyzed. Kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in urine samples collected during the index hospitalization or an outpatient visit 3 months later. Mixed effects models were used to determine the effect of storage time on biomarker levels and stratified by visit. Results: Median storage was 17.8 months (25±75% IQR 10.6±23.7) for samples from the index hospitalization and 14.6 months (IQR 7.3±20.4) for outpatient samples. In the mixed effects models, the only significant association between storage time and biomarker concentration was for KIM-1 in outpatient samples, where each month of storage was associated with a 1.7% decrease (95% CI -3% to -0.3%). There was no relationship between storage time and KIM-1 levels in samples from the index hospitalization. Conclusion: There was no significant impact of storage time over a median of 18 months on urine KIM- 1, NGAL, IL-18 or L-FABP in hospitalized samples; a statistically significant effect towards a decrease over time was noted for KIM-1 in outpatient samples. Additional studies are needed to determine whether longer periods of storage at -70°C systematically impact levels of these analytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0164832
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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complications (disease)
Biomarkers
Acute Kidney Injury
biomarkers
storage time
urine
kidneys
Urine
Lipocalins
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins
Gelatinases
Interleukin-18
Molecules
Outpatients
Kidney
Hospitalization
Wounds and Injuries
sampling
interleukin-18
fatty acid-binding proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Storage time and urine biomarker levels in the ASSESS-AKI study. / ASSESS-AKI Study Investigators.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 10, e0164832, 01.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ASSESS-AKI Study Investigators. / Storage time and urine biomarker levels in the ASSESS-AKI study. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 10.
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abstract = "Background: Although stored urine samples are often used in biomarker studies focused on acute and chronic kidney disease, how storage time impacts biomarker levels is not well understood. Methods: 866 subjects enrolled in the NIDDK-sponsored ASsessment, Serial Evaluation, and Subsequent Sequelae in Acute Kidney Injury (ASSESS-AKI) Study were included. Samples were processed under standard conditions and stored at -70°C until analyzed. Kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in urine samples collected during the index hospitalization or an outpatient visit 3 months later. Mixed effects models were used to determine the effect of storage time on biomarker levels and stratified by visit. Results: Median storage was 17.8 months (25±75{\%} IQR 10.6±23.7) for samples from the index hospitalization and 14.6 months (IQR 7.3±20.4) for outpatient samples. In the mixed effects models, the only significant association between storage time and biomarker concentration was for KIM-1 in outpatient samples, where each month of storage was associated with a 1.7{\%} decrease (95{\%} CI -3{\%} to -0.3{\%}). There was no relationship between storage time and KIM-1 levels in samples from the index hospitalization. Conclusion: There was no significant impact of storage time over a median of 18 months on urine KIM- 1, NGAL, IL-18 or L-FABP in hospitalized samples; a statistically significant effect towards a decrease over time was noted for KIM-1 in outpatient samples. Additional studies are needed to determine whether longer periods of storage at -70°C systematically impact levels of these analytes.",
author = "{ASSESS-AKI Study Investigators} and Liu, {Kathleen D.} and Siew, {Edward D.} and Reeves, {William B} and Jonathan Himmelfarb and Go, {Alan S.} and Hsu, {Chi Yuan} and Bennett, {Michael R.} and Prasad Devarajan and Ikizler, {T. Alp} and Kaufman, {James S.} and Kimmel, {Paul L.} and Chinchilli, {Vernon M.} and Parikh, {Chirag R.} and Nasrollah Ghahramani and Lan Kong and Ming Wang and Elana Farace and Raymond Hsu and Thida Tan and Ordonez, {Juan D.} and Sijie Zheng and Lewis, {Julia B.} and Lorraine Ware and Steven Coca and Moledina, {Dennis G.} and Amit Garg and Michael Zappitelli and Mark Wurfel",
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AU - ASSESS-AKI Study Investigators

AU - Liu, Kathleen D.

AU - Siew, Edward D.

AU - Reeves, William B

AU - Himmelfarb, Jonathan

AU - Go, Alan S.

AU - Hsu, Chi Yuan

AU - Bennett, Michael R.

AU - Devarajan, Prasad

AU - Ikizler, T. Alp

AU - Kaufman, James S.

AU - Kimmel, Paul L.

AU - Chinchilli, Vernon M.

AU - Parikh, Chirag R.

AU - Ghahramani, Nasrollah

AU - Kong, Lan

AU - Wang, Ming

AU - Farace, Elana

AU - Hsu, Raymond

AU - Tan, Thida

AU - Ordonez, Juan D.

AU - Zheng, Sijie

AU - Lewis, Julia B.

AU - Ware, Lorraine

AU - Coca, Steven

AU - Moledina, Dennis G.

AU - Garg, Amit

AU - Zappitelli, Michael

AU - Wurfel, Mark

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background: Although stored urine samples are often used in biomarker studies focused on acute and chronic kidney disease, how storage time impacts biomarker levels is not well understood. Methods: 866 subjects enrolled in the NIDDK-sponsored ASsessment, Serial Evaluation, and Subsequent Sequelae in Acute Kidney Injury (ASSESS-AKI) Study were included. Samples were processed under standard conditions and stored at -70°C until analyzed. Kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in urine samples collected during the index hospitalization or an outpatient visit 3 months later. Mixed effects models were used to determine the effect of storage time on biomarker levels and stratified by visit. Results: Median storage was 17.8 months (25±75% IQR 10.6±23.7) for samples from the index hospitalization and 14.6 months (IQR 7.3±20.4) for outpatient samples. In the mixed effects models, the only significant association between storage time and biomarker concentration was for KIM-1 in outpatient samples, where each month of storage was associated with a 1.7% decrease (95% CI -3% to -0.3%). There was no relationship between storage time and KIM-1 levels in samples from the index hospitalization. Conclusion: There was no significant impact of storage time over a median of 18 months on urine KIM- 1, NGAL, IL-18 or L-FABP in hospitalized samples; a statistically significant effect towards a decrease over time was noted for KIM-1 in outpatient samples. Additional studies are needed to determine whether longer periods of storage at -70°C systematically impact levels of these analytes.

AB - Background: Although stored urine samples are often used in biomarker studies focused on acute and chronic kidney disease, how storage time impacts biomarker levels is not well understood. Methods: 866 subjects enrolled in the NIDDK-sponsored ASsessment, Serial Evaluation, and Subsequent Sequelae in Acute Kidney Injury (ASSESS-AKI) Study were included. Samples were processed under standard conditions and stored at -70°C until analyzed. Kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in urine samples collected during the index hospitalization or an outpatient visit 3 months later. Mixed effects models were used to determine the effect of storage time on biomarker levels and stratified by visit. Results: Median storage was 17.8 months (25±75% IQR 10.6±23.7) for samples from the index hospitalization and 14.6 months (IQR 7.3±20.4) for outpatient samples. In the mixed effects models, the only significant association between storage time and biomarker concentration was for KIM-1 in outpatient samples, where each month of storage was associated with a 1.7% decrease (95% CI -3% to -0.3%). There was no relationship between storage time and KIM-1 levels in samples from the index hospitalization. Conclusion: There was no significant impact of storage time over a median of 18 months on urine KIM- 1, NGAL, IL-18 or L-FABP in hospitalized samples; a statistically significant effect towards a decrease over time was noted for KIM-1 in outpatient samples. Additional studies are needed to determine whether longer periods of storage at -70°C systematically impact levels of these analytes.

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