Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control

Michael L. Parchman, Teshia G. Arambula-Solomon, Polly H Noel, Anne C. Larme, Jacqueline A Pugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: this study was conducted to evaluate whether patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-management behaviors and to determine if movement was related to glucose control. METHODS: A cohort of 428 patients with type 2 diabetes participated in a traditional diabetes education program in a large urban center in the Southwest. The sample was predominantly female with less than a high school education, a mean age of 52 years, and a mean duration of diabetes of 7 years. Two interviews were conducted approximately 9 months apart, at 1 to 4 weeks before the educational program and at 6 months after completing it. Blood specimens were collected at each interview to measure hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels. RESULTS: Most of the patients advanced 1 or more stages of change for at least 1 self-management behavior. Those with diabetes for less than 2 years were significantly more likely to advance at least 1 stage of change for diet and exercise than those with diabetes for more than 2 years. Such advancement was significantly associated with a decline in A1C. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-care behaviors. The intervention was more effective for those with a shorter duration of diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes Educator
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003

Fingerprint

Behavior Control
Self Care
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Education
Glucose
Interviews
Hemoglobins
Exercise
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Parchman, M. L., Arambula-Solomon, T. G., Noel, P. H., Larme, A. C., & Pugh, J. A. (2003). Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control. Diabetes Educator, 29(1), 128-134. https://doi.org/10.1177/014572170302900117

Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control. / Parchman, Michael L.; Arambula-Solomon, Teshia G.; Noel, Polly H; Larme, Anne C.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.

In: Diabetes Educator, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 128-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parchman, ML, Arambula-Solomon, TG, Noel, PH, Larme, AC & Pugh, JA 2003, 'Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control', Diabetes Educator, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 128-134. https://doi.org/10.1177/014572170302900117
Parchman, Michael L. ; Arambula-Solomon, Teshia G. ; Noel, Polly H ; Larme, Anne C. ; Pugh, Jacqueline A. / Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control. In: Diabetes Educator. 2003 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 128-134.
@article{a884075f3a954ac4b96afa9c843a2620,
title = "Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control",
abstract = "PURPOSE: this study was conducted to evaluate whether patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-management behaviors and to determine if movement was related to glucose control. METHODS: A cohort of 428 patients with type 2 diabetes participated in a traditional diabetes education program in a large urban center in the Southwest. The sample was predominantly female with less than a high school education, a mean age of 52 years, and a mean duration of diabetes of 7 years. Two interviews were conducted approximately 9 months apart, at 1 to 4 weeks before the educational program and at 6 months after completing it. Blood specimens were collected at each interview to measure hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels. RESULTS: Most of the patients advanced 1 or more stages of change for at least 1 self-management behavior. Those with diabetes for less than 2 years were significantly more likely to advance at least 1 stage of change for diet and exercise than those with diabetes for more than 2 years. Such advancement was significantly associated with a decline in A1C. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-care behaviors. The intervention was more effective for those with a shorter duration of diabetes.",
author = "Parchman, {Michael L.} and Arambula-Solomon, {Teshia G.} and Noel, {Polly H} and Larme, {Anne C.} and Pugh, {Jacqueline A}",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/014572170302900117",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "128--134",
journal = "Diabetes Educator",
issn = "0145-7217",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stage of change advancement for diabetes self-management behaviors and glucose control

AU - Parchman, Michael L.

AU - Arambula-Solomon, Teshia G.

AU - Noel, Polly H

AU - Larme, Anne C.

AU - Pugh, Jacqueline A

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - PURPOSE: this study was conducted to evaluate whether patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-management behaviors and to determine if movement was related to glucose control. METHODS: A cohort of 428 patients with type 2 diabetes participated in a traditional diabetes education program in a large urban center in the Southwest. The sample was predominantly female with less than a high school education, a mean age of 52 years, and a mean duration of diabetes of 7 years. Two interviews were conducted approximately 9 months apart, at 1 to 4 weeks before the educational program and at 6 months after completing it. Blood specimens were collected at each interview to measure hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels. RESULTS: Most of the patients advanced 1 or more stages of change for at least 1 self-management behavior. Those with diabetes for less than 2 years were significantly more likely to advance at least 1 stage of change for diet and exercise than those with diabetes for more than 2 years. Such advancement was significantly associated with a decline in A1C. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-care behaviors. The intervention was more effective for those with a shorter duration of diabetes.

AB - PURPOSE: this study was conducted to evaluate whether patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-management behaviors and to determine if movement was related to glucose control. METHODS: A cohort of 428 patients with type 2 diabetes participated in a traditional diabetes education program in a large urban center in the Southwest. The sample was predominantly female with less than a high school education, a mean age of 52 years, and a mean duration of diabetes of 7 years. Two interviews were conducted approximately 9 months apart, at 1 to 4 weeks before the educational program and at 6 months after completing it. Blood specimens were collected at each interview to measure hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels. RESULTS: Most of the patients advanced 1 or more stages of change for at least 1 self-management behavior. Those with diabetes for less than 2 years were significantly more likely to advance at least 1 stage of change for diet and exercise than those with diabetes for more than 2 years. Such advancement was significantly associated with a decline in A1C. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in diabetes education advanced through stages of change for self-care behaviors. The intervention was more effective for those with a shorter duration of diabetes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037256219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037256219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/014572170302900117

DO - 10.1177/014572170302900117

M3 - Article

C2 - 12632691

AN - SCOPUS:0037256219

VL - 29

SP - 128

EP - 134

JO - Diabetes Educator

JF - Diabetes Educator

SN - 0145-7217

IS - 1

ER -