Spontaneous gallbladder pathology in baboons

J. L. Slingluff, J. T. Williams, L. Blau, A. Blau, E. J. Dick, G. B. Hubbard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Gallbladder pathology (GBP) is a relatively uncommon, naturally occurring morbidity in both baboons and humans. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 7776 necropsy reports over a 20 year period to determine the prevalence of baboon GBP. Results: Ninety-seven cases of GBP were identified, yielding a 20 year population prevalence of 1.25%. GBP is more common in adult female baboons, occurring with a female to male ratio of nearly 2:1. Among gallbladder pathologies, cholecystitis (35.1%) and cholelithiasis (29.9%) were the most prevalent abnormalities, followed by hyperplasia (16.5%), edema (15.5%), amyloidosis (5.2%), fibrosis (4.1%), necrosis (4.1%), and hemorrhage (1.0%). Conclusion: Many epidemiologic similarities exist between GBP in baboons and humans suggesting that the baboon may serve as a reliable animal model system for investigating GBP in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-96
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Primatology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papio
gall bladder
Gallbladder
Pathology
cholecystitis
cholelithiasis
amyloidosis
Cholecystitis
Cholelithiasis
Amyloidosis
fibrosis
hyperplasia
edema
Hyperplasia
hemorrhage
morbidity
necropsy
Edema
necrosis
Fibrosis

Keywords

  • Bile
  • Cholecystitis
  • Cholelithiasis
  • Gallstones
  • Non-human primate
  • Papio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Slingluff, J. L., Williams, J. T., Blau, L., Blau, A., Dick, E. J., & Hubbard, G. B. (2010). Spontaneous gallbladder pathology in baboons. Journal of Medical Primatology, 39(2), 92-96. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0684.2009.00387.x

Spontaneous gallbladder pathology in baboons. / Slingluff, J. L.; Williams, J. T.; Blau, L.; Blau, A.; Dick, E. J.; Hubbard, G. B.

In: Journal of Medical Primatology, Vol. 39, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 92-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slingluff, JL, Williams, JT, Blau, L, Blau, A, Dick, EJ & Hubbard, GB 2010, 'Spontaneous gallbladder pathology in baboons', Journal of Medical Primatology, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 92-96. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0684.2009.00387.x
Slingluff JL, Williams JT, Blau L, Blau A, Dick EJ, Hubbard GB. Spontaneous gallbladder pathology in baboons. Journal of Medical Primatology. 2010 Apr;39(2):92-96. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0684.2009.00387.x
Slingluff, J. L. ; Williams, J. T. ; Blau, L. ; Blau, A. ; Dick, E. J. ; Hubbard, G. B. / Spontaneous gallbladder pathology in baboons. In: Journal of Medical Primatology. 2010 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 92-96.
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