Split-liver transplantation using the left lateral segment: A collaborative sharing experience between two distant centers

Timothy C. Lee, Neal R. Barshes, W. Kenneth Washburn, Glenn A. Halff, Beth A. Carter, Saul J. Karpen, Lisa J. Bristow, Jaymee D. Scott, John A. Goss

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Split-liver transplantation (SLT) increases the pool of organs for pediatric orthotopic liver transplantation (pOLT). With increased collaboration and organ sharing, transplant centers can fully maximize the use of all split donor allografts. Herein, we report the collaborative results between two distant centers involved in a sharing alliance. The current study consists of a retrospective review of 56 pediatric LLS transplants performed at two collaborating centers between 9/1997 and 10/2003. Fifty-three patients (41% Status 1) were transplanted using 56 left lateral segment (LLS) grafts. Sixteen percent of LLS grafts were shared between the two institutions. Overall patient survival at both 1 and 3 years was 90% and 90%, respectively. Overall graft survival at both 1 and 3 years was 82% and 82%, respectively. Shared patient and graft survival was 89% and 89%, respectively. There was an 11% biliary complication and 18% vascular complication rate. Five patients required retransplantation. In conclusion, SLT increases the number of available allografts for pOLT. While SLT is technically demanding, with a significant learning curve, patient and graft survival rates compare favorably with United Network Organ Sharing (UNOS) averages. Sharing of grafts between centers is a safe and effective way to maximize organ usage and should be actively pursued through collaborative networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1646-1651
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

Keywords

  • Left lateral segment
  • Pediatric transplantation
  • Split-liver transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Split-liver transplantation using the left lateral segment: A collaborative sharing experience between two distant centers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this