Social Cognition Tests Can Discriminate Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia from Alzheimer's Disease Independently of Executive Functioning

Millena Vieira Brandão Moura, Luciano Inácio Mariano, Antônio Lúcio Teixeira, Paulo Caramelli, Leonardo Cruz De Souza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the accuracy of the Social and Emotional Assessment-short version (Mini-SEA) to differentiate subgroups of behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) defined according to executive performance. Methods: bvFTD (n = 21), AD (n = 20), and healthy controls (HC, n = 23) underwent the Mini-SEA, comprising the Facial Emotion Recognition Test (FERT) and the faux-pas test. AD and bvFTD patients were classified according to their performance in the Frontal Assessment Battery into dysexecutive and nondysexecutive subgroups. Results: The area under the curve (AUC) values for the faux-pas test were 0.87 (dysexecutive-bvFTD vs. dysexecutive-AD) and 0.96 (non-dysexecutive-bvFTD vs. nondysexecutive-AD). The AUC values for FERT were 0.99 (dysexecutive-bvFTD vs. dysexecutive-AD) and 0.65 (nondysexecutive-bvFTD vs. nondysexecutive-AD); the AUC values for the Mini-SEA (total-score) were 0.95 (dysexecutive-bvFTD vs. dysexecutive-AD) and 0.88 (nondysexecutive-bvFTD vs. nondysexecutive-AD). Discussion: Social Cognition tests accurately distinguish bvFTD from AD regardless of the executive profile.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-837
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Executive function
  • Frontotemporal dementia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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