Small vessel cerebrovascular disease: The past, present, and future

Reza Behrouz, Ali R. Malek, Michel T. Torbey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain infarction due to small vessel cerebrovascular disease (SVCD)also known as small vessel infarct (SVI) or lacunar strokeaccounts for 20 to 25 of all ischemic strokes. Historically, SVIs have been associated with a favorable short-term prognosis. However, studies over the years have demonstrated that SVCD/SVI is perhaps a more complex and less benign phenomenon than generally presumed. The currently employed diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are based upon historical and contemporary perceptions of SVCD/SVI. What is discovered in the future will unmask the true countenance of SVCD/SVI and help furnish more accurate prognostication schemes and effective treatments for this condition. This paper is an overview of SVCD/SVI with respect to the discoveries of the past, what is known now, and what will the ongoing investigations evince in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number839151
JournalStroke Research and Treatment
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Infarction
Lacunar Stroke
Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Small vessel cerebrovascular disease : The past, present, and future. / Behrouz, Reza; Malek, Ali R.; Torbey, Michel T.

In: Stroke Research and Treatment, 19.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Behrouz, Reza ; Malek, Ali R. ; Torbey, Michel T. / Small vessel cerebrovascular disease : The past, present, and future. In: Stroke Research and Treatment. 2012.
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