Small bowel perforations by metallic grill brush bristles: Clinical presentations and opportunity for prevention

Salvador Sordo, Travis L. Holloway, Russell L. Woodard, Bruce E. Conway, Lillian Liao, Brian J Eastridge, John G Myers, Ronald M Stewart, Daniel L Dent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Increasing reports on the incidental ingestion of metallic bristles from barbeque grill cleaning brushes have been reported.We sought to describe the clinical presentation and grilling habits of patients presenting after ingesting metallic bristles in an attempt to identify risk factors. We performed a chart review of six patients with documented enteric injury from metallic bristles. Subjects were contacted and administered a survey focused on the events surrounding the bristle ingestion. We arranged for in-home visits to inspect the grill and grill brush whenever possible. Of the six subjects identified, three (50%) were male, five (83%) were white, and they ranged in age from 18 to 65 years (mean 42.5). All complained of abdominal pain. All bristles were identified by CT scan. Three patients underwent laparoscopic enterorrhaphy, and two underwent laparotomy. The remaining patients did not require intervention. None had replaced their grill brush in at least two years. Surgeon's awareness of this unusual injury is important to identify and manage this problem. Alternative methods to clean the grill should be sought and grill brushes should be replaced at least every two years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-415
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume82
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

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