Skills training versus psychosocial occupational therapy for persons with persistent schizophrenia

Robert Paul Liberman, Charles J. Wallace, Gayla Blackwell, Alex Kopelowicz, Jerome V. Vaccaro, Jim Mintz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

214 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The authors compared the community functioning of outpatients with persistent forms of schizophrenia after treatment with psychosocial occupational therapy or social skills training, with the latter conducted by paraprofessionals. Method: Eighty outpatients with persistent forms of schizophrenia were randomly assigned to receive either psychosocial occupational therapy or skills training for 12 hours weekly for 6 months, followed by 18 months of follow-up with case management in the community. Antipsychotic medication was prescribed through 'doctor's choice' by psychiatrists who were blind to the psychosocial treatment assignments. Results: Patients who received skills training showed significantly greater independent living skills during a 2-year follow-up of everyday community functioning. Conclusions: Skills training can be effectively conducted by paraprofessionals, with durability and generalization of the skills greater than that achieved by occupational therapists who provide their patients with psychosocial occupational therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1087-1091
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume155
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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