Shifts in uterine microbiome associated with pregnancy outcomes at first insemination and clinical cure in dairy cows with metritis

Caio C. Figueiredo, Hugo F. Monteiro, Federico Cunha, Danilo Z. Bisinotto, Angel Revilla Ruiz, Gustavo A. Duarte, Yong Ge, Fábio S. Lima, Mansour Mohamadzadeh, Klibs N. Galvão, Rafael S. Bisinotto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives were to assess differences in uterine microbiome associated with clinical cure and pregnancy outcomes in dairy cows treated for metritis. Cows with metritis (reddish-brownish, watery, and fetid vaginal discharge) were paired with cows without metritis based on parity and days postpartum. Uterine contents were collected through transcervical lavage at diagnosis, five days later following antimicrobial therapy (day 5), and at 40 days postpartum. Uterine microbiome was assessed by sequencing the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Although alpha-diversity based on Chao1, Shannon, and inverse Simpson indexes at diagnosis did not differ between cows with and without metritis, disease was associated with differences in beta-diversity. Prevalence of Porphyromonas, Bacteroides, and Veillonella was greater in cows with metritis. Streptococcus, Sphingomonas, and Ureaplasma were more prevalent in cows without metritis. Differences in beta-diversity between cows with and without metritis persisted on day 5. Uterine microbiome was not associated with clinical cure. Richness and alpha-diversity, but not beta-diversity, of uterine microbiome 40 days postpartum were associated with metritis and pregnancy. No relationship between uterine microbiome and pregnancy outcomes was observed. Results indicate that factors other than changes in intrauterine bacterial community underlie fertility loss and clinical cure in cows with metritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number11864
JournalScientific reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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