Severe occupational injuries among older workers: Demographic factors, time of injury, place and mechanism of injury, length of stay, and cost data

Cynthia K. Grandjean, Patricia C. McMullen, Kenneth P. Miller, William O. Howie, Kevin Ryan, Alice Myers, Richard Dutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Between 2002 and 2012, the number of individuals > 55 years of age in the workforce is projected to climb by ≈ 50. Few studies have substantiated that severe occupational injury to older workers is a significant problem. To identify the variables related to traumatic injuries of older workers, data were abstracted retrospectively from a regional trauma center database, including demographic and injury characteristics, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and cost. The results showed that older workers had higher fatality rates than younger workers. As age increased, the Injury Severity Score also increased. Most injuries were the result of falls, with orthopedic injuries being the most common type of injury. Patients spent an average of 6 days in the ICU at a cost of > $US4920/day. By identifying the characteristics associated with older workers' severe occupational injuries, further research and better industry programs targeting this group can be implemented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-107
Number of pages5
JournalNursing and Health Sciences
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Older adults
  • Severe occupational injuries
  • Trauma
  • Worker characteristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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