Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the United States. It accounts for 500,000 hospitalizations and 45,000 deaths each year, and it represents one of the most common causes of ICU admission. The mortality rate due to severe CAP has shown little improvement over the past few years, with rates as high as 58% when patients were admitted to the ICU. Significant interest has focused on the sickest patients who have pneumonia treated in the ICU, regarding identification of need for ICU admission and therapies directed to improve outcomes in patients who have severe CAP. This article reviews epidemiologic, microbiologic, therapeutic, preventive, and outcomes data in patients who have CAP in the ICU.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-520
Number of pages18
JournalInfectious Disease Clinics of North America
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Pneumonia
Communicable Diseases
Cause of Death
Hospitalization
Mortality
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Community-acquired infections
  • Intensive care unit
  • Pneumonia
  • Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia. / Restrepo, Marcos; Anzueto, Antonio R.

In: Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, Vol. 23, No. 3, 09.2009, p. 503-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5120e483c528437f9cbc59bb6822edd6,
title = "Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia",
abstract = "Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the United States. It accounts for 500,000 hospitalizations and 45,000 deaths each year, and it represents one of the most common causes of ICU admission. The mortality rate due to severe CAP has shown little improvement over the past few years, with rates as high as 58{\%} when patients were admitted to the ICU. Significant interest has focused on the sickest patients who have pneumonia treated in the ICU, regarding identification of need for ICU admission and therapies directed to improve outcomes in patients who have severe CAP. This article reviews epidemiologic, microbiologic, therapeutic, preventive, and outcomes data in patients who have CAP in the ICU.",
keywords = "Community-acquired infections, Intensive care unit, Pneumonia, Therapeutics",
author = "Marcos Restrepo and Anzueto, {Antonio R}",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.idc.2009.04.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "503--520",
journal = "Infectious Disease Clinics of North America",
issn = "0891-5520",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia

AU - Restrepo, Marcos

AU - Anzueto, Antonio R

PY - 2009/9

Y1 - 2009/9

N2 - Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the United States. It accounts for 500,000 hospitalizations and 45,000 deaths each year, and it represents one of the most common causes of ICU admission. The mortality rate due to severe CAP has shown little improvement over the past few years, with rates as high as 58% when patients were admitted to the ICU. Significant interest has focused on the sickest patients who have pneumonia treated in the ICU, regarding identification of need for ICU admission and therapies directed to improve outcomes in patients who have severe CAP. This article reviews epidemiologic, microbiologic, therapeutic, preventive, and outcomes data in patients who have CAP in the ICU.

AB - Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the United States. It accounts for 500,000 hospitalizations and 45,000 deaths each year, and it represents one of the most common causes of ICU admission. The mortality rate due to severe CAP has shown little improvement over the past few years, with rates as high as 58% when patients were admitted to the ICU. Significant interest has focused on the sickest patients who have pneumonia treated in the ICU, regarding identification of need for ICU admission and therapies directed to improve outcomes in patients who have severe CAP. This article reviews epidemiologic, microbiologic, therapeutic, preventive, and outcomes data in patients who have CAP in the ICU.

KW - Community-acquired infections

KW - Intensive care unit

KW - Pneumonia

KW - Therapeutics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=68149167113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=68149167113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.idc.2009.04.003

DO - 10.1016/j.idc.2009.04.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 19665080

AN - SCOPUS:68149167113

VL - 23

SP - 503

EP - 520

JO - Infectious Disease Clinics of North America

JF - Infectious Disease Clinics of North America

SN - 0891-5520

IS - 3

ER -