SES and ethnic differences in perceived caregiver availability among young-old Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites

Melissa A. Talamantes, John Cornell, David V. Espino, Michael J. Lichtenstein, Helen P. Hazuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Differences in perceived caregiver availability were examined among a random sample of Mexican American (MA) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) young- old residents (58-74 years old) in three socioeconomically distinct neighborhoods in San Antonio, Texas. For MAs across all three socioeconomic status (SES) groups, being female, widowed, and having more chronic illnesses were associated with a lesser likelihood of perceived caregiver availability. SES and number of children were not associated with perceived caregiver availability. Among MAs and NHWs of middle- and upper-SES, being male, married, and of upper-SES were associated with a greater likelihood of perceived caregiver availability. The number of children modified the associations of both SES and ethnic group with perceived caregiver availability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-99
Number of pages12
JournalGerontologist
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1996

Keywords

  • Caregiver relationship
  • Ethnic groups
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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