Serum gentamicin levels in patients with post-cesarean endomyometritis

P. Duff, J. H. Jorgensen, R. S. Gibbs, J. D. Blanco, G. Alexander, Y. S. Castaneda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Serum gentamicin levels were measured by agar diffusion bioassay in 38 patients undergoing treatment with clindamycin-gentamicin for post-cesarean endomyometritis. Patients received intravenous gentamicin in a dose of 1 mg/kg actual body weight every eight hours. All trough levels were less than 1μg/ml. The mean 30-minute postinfusion level was 5.78 ± 2.43 μg/ml (mean ± SD). The range of postinfusion concentrations was 1 to 12 μg/ml. Postinfusion concentrations were less than 5 μg/ml in 13 patients, but none of these individuals experienced a clinical failure of antimicrobial therapy. There were no statistically significant differences in mean age, weight, hematocrit, serum creatinine, estimated creatinine clearance, or administered dose in patients with therapeutc gentamicin levels and patients with apparent subtherapeutic levels. The authors conclude that postinfusion gentamicin concentrations fluctuate widely in obstetric patients receiving 1 mg/kg/dose and that apparent subtherapeutic postinfusion levels still may be clinically efficacious, depending upon the antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting microorganisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-727
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume61
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1983

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Endometritis
Gentamicins
Serum
Creatinine
Clindamycin
Hematocrit
Biological Assay
Obstetrics
Agar
Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Duff, P., Jorgensen, J. H., Gibbs, R. S., Blanco, J. D., Alexander, G., & Castaneda, Y. S. (1983). Serum gentamicin levels in patients with post-cesarean endomyometritis. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 61(6), 723-727.

Serum gentamicin levels in patients with post-cesarean endomyometritis. / Duff, P.; Jorgensen, J. H.; Gibbs, R. S.; Blanco, J. D.; Alexander, G.; Castaneda, Y. S.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 61, No. 6, 1983, p. 723-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duff, P, Jorgensen, JH, Gibbs, RS, Blanco, JD, Alexander, G & Castaneda, YS 1983, 'Serum gentamicin levels in patients with post-cesarean endomyometritis', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 723-727.
Duff P, Jorgensen JH, Gibbs RS, Blanco JD, Alexander G, Castaneda YS. Serum gentamicin levels in patients with post-cesarean endomyometritis. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1983;61(6):723-727.
Duff, P. ; Jorgensen, J. H. ; Gibbs, R. S. ; Blanco, J. D. ; Alexander, G. ; Castaneda, Y. S. / Serum gentamicin levels in patients with post-cesarean endomyometritis. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1983 ; Vol. 61, No. 6. pp. 723-727.
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