Separation and analysis of subcellular organelles in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60

Application to the study of myeloid lysosomal enzyme synthesis and processing

W. M. Nauseef, Robert A Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a system for analysis of the intracellular pathways in the biosynthesis and packaging of functionally important proteins in human myeloid cells. The human promyelocytic cell line HL-60 was used since peripheral blood neutrophils are terminally differentiated and do not actively synthesize protein. Cells were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and subcellular organelles in postnuclear supernatant separated on a discontinuous gradient of Percoll modified to resolve organelles important in protein synthesis. This Percoll gradient separated azurophilic granules from less dense organelles and partially separated the less dense organelles from one another. Approximate densities of organelles identified by electron microscopy and by biochemical markers are azurophilic granules, 1.102 g/mL; endoplasmic reticulum, 1.039 g/mL; Golgi apparatus, 1.032 g/mL; and plasma membrane, 1.027 g/mL. We validated the utility of this method of subcellular fractionation by examining intracellular transport of myeloperoxidase, a myeloid lysosomal enzyme present in azurophilic granules. The subunits of mature myeloperoxidase (molecular weight [mol wt] = 59,000 and 13,500) cosediment with biochemical markers for lysosomes, whereas the large-mol wt (89,000) precursor forms cosediments with biochemical markers of less dense organelles. Within the limits of assay sensitivity, the 89,000-mol wt precursor is enzymatically inactive and has no spectral evidence for a heme group, suggesting that precursors of myeloperoxidase may undergo proteolytic maturation in a prelysosomal compartment with concomitant incorporation of a heme group and acquisition of enzymatic activity. This system of analysis should be suitable for the identication, subcellular localization, and maturational analysis of other myeloid lysosomal enzymes as well as functionally important membrane proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-449
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume68
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Organelles
Peroxidase
Leukemia
Molecular weight
Cells
Heme
Cell Line
Enzymes
Processing
Proteins
Biomarkers
Molecular Weight
Biosynthesis
Cell membranes
Fractionation
Systems Analysis
Cavitation
Electron microscopy
Assays
Packaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

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title = "Separation and analysis of subcellular organelles in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60: Application to the study of myeloid lysosomal enzyme synthesis and processing",
abstract = "We describe a system for analysis of the intracellular pathways in the biosynthesis and packaging of functionally important proteins in human myeloid cells. The human promyelocytic cell line HL-60 was used since peripheral blood neutrophils are terminally differentiated and do not actively synthesize protein. Cells were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and subcellular organelles in postnuclear supernatant separated on a discontinuous gradient of Percoll modified to resolve organelles important in protein synthesis. This Percoll gradient separated azurophilic granules from less dense organelles and partially separated the less dense organelles from one another. Approximate densities of organelles identified by electron microscopy and by biochemical markers are azurophilic granules, 1.102 g/mL; endoplasmic reticulum, 1.039 g/mL; Golgi apparatus, 1.032 g/mL; and plasma membrane, 1.027 g/mL. We validated the utility of this method of subcellular fractionation by examining intracellular transport of myeloperoxidase, a myeloid lysosomal enzyme present in azurophilic granules. The subunits of mature myeloperoxidase (molecular weight [mol wt] = 59,000 and 13,500) cosediment with biochemical markers for lysosomes, whereas the large-mol wt (89,000) precursor forms cosediments with biochemical markers of less dense organelles. Within the limits of assay sensitivity, the 89,000-mol wt precursor is enzymatically inactive and has no spectral evidence for a heme group, suggesting that precursors of myeloperoxidase may undergo proteolytic maturation in a prelysosomal compartment with concomitant incorporation of a heme group and acquisition of enzymatic activity. This system of analysis should be suitable for the identication, subcellular localization, and maturational analysis of other myeloid lysosomal enzymes as well as functionally important membrane proteins.",
author = "Nauseef, {W. M.} and Clark, {Robert A}",
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T1 - Separation and analysis of subcellular organelles in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60

T2 - Application to the study of myeloid lysosomal enzyme synthesis and processing

AU - Nauseef, W. M.

AU - Clark, Robert A

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - We describe a system for analysis of the intracellular pathways in the biosynthesis and packaging of functionally important proteins in human myeloid cells. The human promyelocytic cell line HL-60 was used since peripheral blood neutrophils are terminally differentiated and do not actively synthesize protein. Cells were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and subcellular organelles in postnuclear supernatant separated on a discontinuous gradient of Percoll modified to resolve organelles important in protein synthesis. This Percoll gradient separated azurophilic granules from less dense organelles and partially separated the less dense organelles from one another. Approximate densities of organelles identified by electron microscopy and by biochemical markers are azurophilic granules, 1.102 g/mL; endoplasmic reticulum, 1.039 g/mL; Golgi apparatus, 1.032 g/mL; and plasma membrane, 1.027 g/mL. We validated the utility of this method of subcellular fractionation by examining intracellular transport of myeloperoxidase, a myeloid lysosomal enzyme present in azurophilic granules. The subunits of mature myeloperoxidase (molecular weight [mol wt] = 59,000 and 13,500) cosediment with biochemical markers for lysosomes, whereas the large-mol wt (89,000) precursor forms cosediments with biochemical markers of less dense organelles. Within the limits of assay sensitivity, the 89,000-mol wt precursor is enzymatically inactive and has no spectral evidence for a heme group, suggesting that precursors of myeloperoxidase may undergo proteolytic maturation in a prelysosomal compartment with concomitant incorporation of a heme group and acquisition of enzymatic activity. This system of analysis should be suitable for the identication, subcellular localization, and maturational analysis of other myeloid lysosomal enzymes as well as functionally important membrane proteins.

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