Self-blame, self-forgiveness, and spirituality in breast cancer survivors in a public sector setting

Lois C. Friedman, Catherine R. Barber, Jenny Chang, Yee Lu Tham, Mamta Kalidas, Mothaffar F. Rimawi, Mario F. Dulay, Richard Elledge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cognitive appraisal affects adjustment to breast cancer. A self-forgiving attitude and spirituality may benefit breast cancer survivors who blame themselves for their cancer. One hundred and eight women with early breast cancers completed questionnaires assessing self-blame, self-forgiveness, spirituality, mood and quality of life (QoL) in an outpatient breast clinic. Women who blamed themselves reported more mood disturbance (p<0.01) and poorer QoL (p<0.01). Women who were more self-forgiving and more spiritual reported less mood disturbance and better QoL (p's<0.01). Interventions that reduce self-blame and facilitate self-forgiveness and spirituality could promote better adjustment to breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-348
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

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Keywords

  • Breast cancer survivors
  • Self-blame
  • Self-forgiveness
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Friedman, L. C., Barber, C. R., Chang, J., Tham, Y. L., Kalidas, M., Rimawi, M. F., Dulay, M. F., & Elledge, R. (2010). Self-blame, self-forgiveness, and spirituality in breast cancer survivors in a public sector setting. Journal of Cancer Education, 25(3), 343-348. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-010-0048-3