Selective brain cooling after bilateral superior cervical sympathectomy in sheep (Ovis aries)

Mark J.M. Nijland, Duncan Mitchell, Graham Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have investigated the role of the sympathetic innervation of the vasculature of the head in the control of selective brain cooling of sheep, during exposure to high and low ambient temperatures and during endotoxin-induced fever. Bilateral removal of the superior cervical ganglia resulted in a significant reduciton of hypothalamic temperture during all procedures. Respiratory rate was also depressed by the sympathectomy, apparently mainly as a result of a decrease in nasal airway patency. Rectal temperature changes after sympathectomy were dependent on the experimental conditions, and the rectal - hypothalamic temperature difference was enhanced during heat exposure and fever. Our results support the contention that sympathetically mediated changes in nasal blood flow and in venous return from the nasal cavity, via the angularis oculi and facial veins, may be involved in the control of selective brain cooling in sheep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalPflügers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
Volume417
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Body temperature
  • Brain temperature
  • Sympathetic nervous system
  • Thermoregulation
  • fever
  • α-adrenergic
  • β-adrenergic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Physiology (medical)

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