Segmental vessel wall shear stress and neointimal formation after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation: Physiological insights in a porcine coronary model

Andrew J. Carter, Wei Wei, Lori Gibson, Robin Collingwood, Fermin Tio, John Dooley, Gregory A. Kopia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Low vessel-wall shear stress promotes atherosclerosis and restenosis. We conducted serial analysis of vessel-wall shear stress following placement of metal and sirolimus (SRL) stents to determine the relationship between shear stress and neointima. Methods: Serial quantitative coronary angiography, intracoronary ultrasound (IVUS), and Doppler flow analysis were performed at baseline, immediately poststent, and at 30 and 90 days on 16 stents (metal, n=8; SRL, n= 8) implanted in the coronary arteries of eight miniswine. Segmental vessel-wall shear stress (dyn/cm2) was calculated at 10 sections within the stent and normalized to the average proximal and distal reference vessel shear stress using IVUS and hyperemic average peak flow velocity. At 90 days, histological analysis was completed to determine vessel-wall morphometry on corresponding sections from each stent. Results: Stent placement resulted in a similar degree of in-stent stenosis (-5% to 25%) and immediate post-in-stent shear stress. At 30 days, the IVUS neointimal cross-sectional area and percentage of area stenosis were significantly less in SRL (1.2±0.8 mm2; 12.7±8.5%) versus metal stents (2.3±0.4 mm2; 28.2±3.4%, P<.003). In-stent normalized shear stress was less for SRL (0.93±0.07) versus metal (1.07±0.08, P=.002) stents. At 90 days, the mean neointimal area was similar for the SRL (2.50±0.47 mm2) and metal stents (2.72±1.15 mm2). Linear regression documented a negative correlation between poststent shear stress and neointima for metal stents (r=.61, P<.0001). In the SRL stents, however, the post-in-stent shear stress had a positive correlation with neointima (r=.40, P=.0002). Conclusions: The placement of oversized stents causes alteration of segmental vessel-wall shear stress, which appears to be an important physiological stimulus for neointimal formation, and may influence the pharmacodynamics of SRL-eluting stent in the porcine coronary model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages7
JournalCardiovascular Revascularization Medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Restenosis
  • Sirolimus
  • Stents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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