Screening for Speech and Language Delay and Disorders in Children: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Michael J. Barry, Wanda K. Nicholson, Michael Silverstein, David Chelmow, Tumaini Rucker Coker, Esa M. Davis, Katrina E. Donahue, Carlos Roberto Jaén, Li Li, Carol M. Mangione, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Goutham Rao, John M. Ruiz, James Stevermer, Joel Tsevat, Sandra Millon Underwood, John B. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Speech and language delays and disorders can pose significant problems for children and their families. Evidence suggests that school-aged children with speech or language delays may be at increased risk of learning and literacy disabilities, including difficulties with reading and writing. Objective: The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate benefits and harms of screening for speech and language delay and disorders in children 5 years or younger. Population: Asymptomatic children 5 years or younger whose parents or clinicians do not have specific concerns about their speech, language, hearing, or development. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for speech and language delay and disorders in children who do not present with signs or symptoms or parent/caregiver concerns. Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for speech and language delay and disorders in children 5 years or younger without signs or symptoms. (I statement).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-334
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA
Volume331
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 23 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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