Screening and Preventive Interventions for Oral Health in Children and Adolescents Aged 5 to 17 Years: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Michael J. Barry, Wanda K. Nicholson, Michael Silverstein, David Chelmow, Tumaini Rucker Coker, Esa M. Davis, Katrina E. Donahue, Carlos Roberto Jaén, Li Li, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Lori Pbert, Goutham Rao, John M. Ruiz, James Stevermer, Joel Tsevat, Sandra Millon Underwood, John B. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Oral health is fundamental to health and well-being across the lifespan. Oral health conditions affect the daily lives of school-age children and adolescents, leading to loss of more than 51 million school hours every year. Untreated oral health conditions in children can lead to serious infections and affect growth, development, and quality of life. Objective: The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate screening and preventive interventions for oral health conditions in children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years. Population: Asymptomatic children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for oral health conditions (eg, dental caries) performed by primary care clinicians in asymptomatic children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of preventive interventions for oral health conditions (eg, dental caries) performed by primary care clinicians in asymptomatic children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years. Recommendations: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine screening performed by primary care clinicians for oral health conditions, including dental caries, in children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of preventive interventions performed by primary care clinicians for oral health conditions, including dental caries, in children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years. (I statement).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1666-1673
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA
Volume330
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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