Salient degradation features of a 50: 50 PLA/PGA scaffold for tissue engineering

A. R. Singhal, C. M. Agrawal, K. A. Athanasiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An implant system that undergoes a gradual, time-dependent, nontoxic degradation process may offer an efficacious, safe, and desirable alternative to metallic materials used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal conditions. Such a scaffold may also be a suitable vehicle for growing cells and tissue in the laboratory for tissue engineering applications. We have used a scaffold of this type previously in animal studies for biological resurfacing of large articular cartilage defects. This study examined important in vitro degradation characteristics of a 50:50 polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid (PLG) implant during an 8-week period. It was determined that this particular implant degraded in a biphasic fashion. The initial phase occurred during the first 2 weeks with a decrease in molecular weight and surface axial strain, coupled with an increase in percent porosity. The second phase demonstrated a decline in surface axial strain by 4 weeks and an ongoing decline in molecular weight. Loss of gross structural properties was not evident until the start of the second phase and was complete at 8 weeks. This study demonstrated the potential uses for this implant as a means of providing structural support for cells and tissue ingrowth for up to 8 weeks. Further studies need to be conducted in order to determine the biological effects of the degrading polymer byproducts on host tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-207
Number of pages11
JournalTissue Engineering
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1996

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Prostaglandins A
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue engineering
Tissue
Degradation
Molecular Weight
Molecular weight
Polyglycolic Acid
Acids
Porosity
Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Scaffolds
Byproducts
Structural properties
Polymers
Animals
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Singhal, A. R., Agrawal, C. M., & Athanasiou, K. A. (1996). Salient degradation features of a 50: 50 PLA/PGA scaffold for tissue engineering. Tissue Engineering, 2(3), 197-207.

Salient degradation features of a 50 : 50 PLA/PGA scaffold for tissue engineering. / Singhal, A. R.; Agrawal, C. M.; Athanasiou, K. A.

In: Tissue Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 3, 09.1996, p. 197-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singhal, AR, Agrawal, CM & Athanasiou, KA 1996, 'Salient degradation features of a 50: 50 PLA/PGA scaffold for tissue engineering', Tissue Engineering, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 197-207.
Singhal, A. R. ; Agrawal, C. M. ; Athanasiou, K. A. / Salient degradation features of a 50 : 50 PLA/PGA scaffold for tissue engineering. In: Tissue Engineering. 1996 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 197-207.
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