Results of the NIDA treatment demonstration grants' cocaine workgroup: characteristics of cocaine users and HIV risk behaviors

Wilson M. Compton, Richard J Lamb, Bennett W. Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This journal issue includes seven articles (six plus this introduction) from the "cocaine workgroup" of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) treatment demonstration grants. In this introduction, results of the first attempts to compare data from seven disparate demonstration grant sites are summarized: Overall, rates of recent cocaine use were high in all locations, injection drug use was common, age of first drug use was between 14 and 17 years with age of first cocaine use between 20 and 25 years, arrests were common at all sites especially among cocaine injectors, and polydrug use was the norm. Interestingly, both gender and ethnic status were significantly associated with polydrug use and marijuana use among the cocaine users. These results indicated that it is possible to define variables precisely for analysis across sites and laid the groundwork for the next set of analyses in which the common theme of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors among cocaine abusers was agreed upon. This next set of analyses are included in the following six papers. Overall, these reports confirm recent data about the association of cocaine use with HIV risk behaviors. They extend considerably the literature on the association of cocaine with HIV risk behaviors, and the report from New York in which therapeutic community treatment was shown to be feasible and possibly useful to methadone clients represents an interesting and new finding. In conclusion, cross-site collaborations can take different forms and this collection of papers represents one successful approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.)
Drug therapy
Organized Financing
drug abuse
Risk-Taking
Cocaine
Viruses
risk behavior
grant
Demonstrations
HIV
drug use
therapeutic community
Therapeutics
gender
Therapeutic Community
Methadone
Cannabis
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • HIV
  • HIV risk behavior
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Results of the NIDA treatment demonstration grants' cocaine workgroup : characteristics of cocaine users and HIV risk behaviors. / Compton, Wilson M.; Lamb, Richard J; Fletcher, Bennett W.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1995, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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