Relationship between self-reported physical health problems and sleep disturbances among trauma survivors: A brief report

Katherine E. Miller, Anna E. Jaffe, Joanne L. Davis, Kristi E. Pruiksma, Jamie L. Rhudy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: History of trauma exposure is often associated with negative physical health outcomes. Better understanding of this association may have important implications for improved health and decreased health care-related costs. One possible link between trauma and poor health outcomes is the pernicious impact of sleep disturbances. In the present study, it was hypothesized that sleep quality would predict physical health symptoms above and beyond posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Methods: Fifty-four trauma-exposed adults participated in a randomized controlled trial for treatment of trauma-related nightmares. Physical health symptoms, depression, PTSD symptoms, and sleep quality were assessed via self-report. Results: Consistent with expectations, analyses revealed sleep quality uniquely contributed to physical health symptoms above and beyond PTSD and depression symptoms. Moreover, sleep quality mediated the relationship between PTSD symptoms and physical health symptoms. Conclusions: Findings suggest sleep disturbances may require specific interventions to maximize positive physical and mental health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-168
Number of pages3
JournalSleep Health
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Health
  • Insomnia
  • Posttraumatic stress
  • Sleep quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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