Relation of glycohemoglobin and adiposity to atherosclerosis in youth

Henry C. McGill, C. Alex McMahan, Gray T. Malcom, Margaret C. Oalmann, Jack P. Strong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

236 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a cooperative multicenter study (Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth, PDAY) of 1532 young persons 15 through 34 years of age who died of external causes and were autopsied in medical examiners' laboratories, we quantified atherosclerosis of the aorta and the right coronary artery. We analyzed postmortem blood cells for glycohemoglobin and postmortem serum for lipoprotein cholesterol and thiocyanate (as an indicator for smoking). We measured the thickness of the panniculus adiposus and the body mass index (weight per height squared) as indicators of adiposity. Glycohemoglobin levels exceeding 8% were associated with substantially more extensive fatty streaks and raised lesions in the right coronary artery in persons more than 25 years of age and with more extensive raised lesions in the aorta in persons more than 30 years of age. Both thickness of the panniculus adiposus and body mass index were associated with more extensive fatty streaks and raised lesions in the right coronary artery. The associations of atherosclerotic lesions with glycohemoglobin and adiposity were not explained by a less favorable lipoprotein profile or smoking. The results show that atherosclerosis in young adults is associated with the prediabetic or early diabetic state, as indicated by elevated glycohemoglobin levels, and with obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-440
Number of pages10
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1995

Keywords

  • adiposity
  • atherosclerosis
  • body mass index
  • glycohemoglobin
  • panniculus adiposus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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