Regulatory T cells and treatment of cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are elevated in cancers and can thwart protective antitumor immunity. Recent human cancer trials suggest that depleting Tregs can be clinically beneficial. Additional types of deleterious regulatory cells are also increased in cancer. Tregs also play unanticipated roles in cancer therapy in that some drugs unexpectedly increase (e.g. cancer vaccines or IL-2 treatment) or decrease (e.g. antineoangiogenesis agents or receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors) their numbers or function. Managing deleterious effects of regulatory cells represents a novel and potentially effective way to give immunotherapy for cancer. New insights into molecular mechanisms governing trafficking, differentiation, and function of these cells suggest novel approaches to manipulating them as treatment strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-246
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Immunology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

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Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Cancer Vaccines
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Immunotherapy
Interleukin-2
Cell Differentiation
Immunity
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Regulatory T cells and treatment of cancer. / Curiel, Tyler J.

In: Current Opinion in Immunology, Vol. 20, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 241-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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