Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment

Carlo O. Martinez, Matthew J. McHale, Jason T. Wells, Oscar Ochoa, Joel E Michalek, Linda M Mcmanus, Paula K Shireman

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Abstract

Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2-/- mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1 , -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2-/- mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1-/- and CCR2-/- mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2-/- mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1-/- mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1-/- mice, and severely impaired in CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1-/- mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2-/- mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1-/- mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1-/- mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume299
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

CCR2 Receptors
Chemokines
Chemokine CCL2
Regeneration
Skeletal Muscle
Macrophages
Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins
Muscles
Adipocytes
Wounds and Injuries
Chemokine CCL7
Cardiotoxins
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • CC chemokine receptor 2
  • MCP-1/CCL2
  • MCP-5/CCL12
  • Monocyte/macrophage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment",
abstract = "Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2-/- mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1 , -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2-/- mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1-/- and CCR2-/- mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2-/- mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1-/- mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1-/- mice, and severely impaired in CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1-/- mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2-/- mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1-/- mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1-/- mice.",
keywords = "Angiogenesis, CC chemokine receptor 2, MCP-1/CCL2, MCP-5/CCL12, Monocyte/macrophage",
author = "Martinez, {Carlo O.} and McHale, {Matthew J.} and Wells, {Jason T.} and Oscar Ochoa and Michalek, {Joel E} and Mcmanus, {Linda M} and Shireman, {Paula K}",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
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journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology",
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T1 - Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment

AU - Martinez, Carlo O.

AU - McHale, Matthew J.

AU - Wells, Jason T.

AU - Ochoa, Oscar

AU - Michalek, Joel E

AU - Mcmanus, Linda M

AU - Shireman, Paula K

PY - 2010/9

Y1 - 2010/9

N2 - Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2-/- mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1 , -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2-/- mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1-/- and CCR2-/- mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2-/- mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1-/- mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1-/- mice, and severely impaired in CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1-/- mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2-/- mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1-/- mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1-/- mice.

AB - Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2-/- mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1 , -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2-/- mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1-/- and CCR2-/- mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2-/- mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1-/- mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1-/- mice, and severely impaired in CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1-/- mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2-/- mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1-/- mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1-/- mice.

KW - Angiogenesis

KW - CC chemokine receptor 2

KW - MCP-1/CCL2

KW - MCP-5/CCL12

KW - Monocyte/macrophage

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