Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging

Z. S. Tan, W. S. Harris, A. S. Beiser, R. Au, J. J. Himali, S. Debette, A. Pikula, C. DeCarli, P. A. Wolf, R. S. Vasan, S. J. Robins, Sudha Seshadri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Higher dietary intake and circulating levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosa-pentaenoic acid (EPA) have been related to a reduced risk for dementia, but the pathways underlying this association remain unclear. We examined the cross-sectional relation of red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels to subclinical imaging and cognitive markers of dementia risk in a middle-aged to elderly community-based cohort. Methods: We related RBC DHA and EPA levels in dementia-free Framingham Study participants (n = 1,575; 854 women, age 67 ± 9 years) to performance on cognitive tests and to volumetric brain MRI, with serial adjustments for age, sex, and education (model A, primary model), additionally for APOE ε4 and plasma homocysteine (model B), and also for physical activity and body mass index (model C), or for traditional vascular risk factors (model D). Results: Participants with RBC DHA levels in the lowest quartile (Q1) when compared to others (Q2-4) had lower total brain and greater white matter hyperintensity volumes (for model A: β ±SE=-0.49 ± 0.19; p = 0.009, and 0.12 ± 0.06; p = 0.049, respectively) with persistence of the association with total brain volume in multivariable analyses. Participants with lower DHA and ω-3 index (RBC DHA+EPA) levels (Q1 vs Q2-4) also had lower scores on tests of visual memory (β ± SE = -0.47 ± 0.18; p = 0.008), executive function (β ± SE = -0.07 ± 0.03; p = 0.004), and abstract thinking (β ± SE = -0.52 ± 0.18; p = 0.004) in model A, the results remaining significant in all models. Conclusion: Lower RBC DHA levels are associated with smaller brain volumes and a "vascular" pattern of cognitive impairment even in persons free of clinical dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-664
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume78
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Docosahexaenoic Acids
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Erythrocytes
Dementia
Brain
Acids
Sex Education
Executive Function
Homocysteine
Blood Vessels
Body Mass Index
Fatty Acids
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Tan, Z. S., Harris, W. S., Beiser, A. S., Au, R., Himali, J. J., Debette, S., ... Seshadri, S. (2012). Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging. Neurology, 78(9), 658-664. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318249f6a9

Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging. / Tan, Z. S.; Harris, W. S.; Beiser, A. S.; Au, R.; Himali, J. J.; Debette, S.; Pikula, A.; DeCarli, C.; Wolf, P. A.; Vasan, R. S.; Robins, S. J.; Seshadri, Sudha.

In: Neurology, Vol. 78, No. 9, 28.02.2012, p. 658-664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tan, ZS, Harris, WS, Beiser, AS, Au, R, Himali, JJ, Debette, S, Pikula, A, DeCarli, C, Wolf, PA, Vasan, RS, Robins, SJ & Seshadri, S 2012, 'Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging', Neurology, vol. 78, no. 9, pp. 658-664. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318249f6a9
Tan ZS, Harris WS, Beiser AS, Au R, Himali JJ, Debette S et al. Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging. Neurology. 2012 Feb 28;78(9):658-664. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318249f6a9
Tan, Z. S. ; Harris, W. S. ; Beiser, A. S. ; Au, R. ; Himali, J. J. ; Debette, S. ; Pikula, A. ; DeCarli, C. ; Wolf, P. A. ; Vasan, R. S. ; Robins, S. J. ; Seshadri, Sudha. / Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging. In: Neurology. 2012 ; Vol. 78, No. 9. pp. 658-664.
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AU - Tan, Z. S.

AU - Harris, W. S.

AU - Beiser, A. S.

AU - Au, R.

AU - Himali, J. J.

AU - Debette, S.

AU - Pikula, A.

AU - DeCarli, C.

AU - Wolf, P. A.

AU - Vasan, R. S.

AU - Robins, S. J.

AU - Seshadri, Sudha

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