Reaction time and cognitive-linguistic performance in adults with mild traumatic brain injury

Rocío S. Norman, Manish N. Shah, Lyn S. Turkstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize cognitive-linguistic performance in adults with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) to advance assessment and treatment practices. We hypothesized that individuals with mTBI would demonstrate longer reaction times (RTs) and greater error rates when compared to an orthopedic injury (OI) group on a category-naming task. Method: Participants were age and education-matched adults with mTBI (n = 20; 12 females) and adults with OI (n = 21; 5 females) who were discharged to home after an Emergency Department visit. Our primary task was a category-naming task shown to be sensitive to language deficits after mTBI. The task was adapted and administered under speeded and unspeeded conditions. Results: There was a significant main effect of condition on RT (speeded faster than unspeeded) and accuracy (more errors in the speeded condition). There was a marginally significant effect of group on errors, with more errors in the mTBI group than the OI group. Naming RT and accuracy in both conditions were moderately correlated with injury variables and symptom burden. Conclusions: Our data showed a marginal effect of group on accuracy of performance. Correlations found between naming and neurobehavioural symptoms, including sleep quality, suggest that the latter should be considered in future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1173-1183
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Injury
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 29 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adult
  • brain injuries
  • cognitive-linguistic
  • mild traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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