Rapid screen of human genes for relevance to cancer using fission yeast

Kyung Sook Chung, Young Joo Jang, Nam Soon Kim, Sun Yong Park, Shin Jung Choi, Ji Youn Kim, Ji Hee Ahn, Hyun Ji Lee, Ji Hyun Lim, Ju Hyun Song, Jae Hoon Ji, Jung Hwa Oh, Bin Song Kyung, Hyang Sook Yoo, Misun Won

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

A total of 437 human full-length cDNAs isolated by microarray analysis of liver and/or gastric cancer tissues were evaluated for their relevance to cancer using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Overexpression of 161 human cDNAs in S. pombe caused growth inhibition and/or morphological changes, which can be considered as cancer-related phenotypes of S. pombe. Sixteen genes causing growth defects and morphological changes at the same time were chosen to validate their ostensible oncogenic properties. They were highly expressed in liver and/or gastric cancer cell lines. Also, when the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell type NIH3T3 was transfected with these genes, the proliferation rates of cells were increased by 32% to 120%. This study demonstrates that fission yeast can be used as an advantageous and powerful tool for the rapid screening of human genes relevant to cancer. Furthermore, the human genes screened can be tested further as diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for liver and stomach cancers. They also can be studied further for the elucidation of mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-577
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomolecular Screening
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cell-based assay
  • Fission yeast
  • Oncogenesis
  • Overexpression
  • Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

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