Rapamycin-induced metabolic defects are reversible in both lean and obese mice

Yuhong Liu, Vivian Diaz, Elizabeth Fernandez, Randy Strong, Lan Ye, Joseph A. Baur, Dudley W. Lamming, Arlan Richardson, Adam B. Salmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The inhibition of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) by the macrolide rapamycin has many beneficial effects in mice, including extension of lifespan and reduction or prevention of several age-related diseases. At the same time, chronic rapamycin treatment causes impairments in glucose metabolism including hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. It is unknown whether these metabolic effects of rapamycin are permanent or whether they can be alleviated. Here, we confirmed that rapamycin causes glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in both inbred and genetically heterogeneous mice fed either low fat or high fat diets, suggesting that these effects of rapamycin are independent of genetic background. Importantly, we also found that these effects were almost completely lost within a few weeks of cessation of treatment, showing that chronic rapamycin treatment does not induce permanent impairment of glucose metabolism. Somewhat surprisingly, chronic rapamycin also promoted increased accumulation of adipose tissue in high fat fed mice. However, this effect too was lost when rapamycin treatment was ended suggesting that this effect of rapamycin is also not permanent. The reversible nature of rapamycin's alterations of metabolic function suggests that these potentially detrimental side-effects might be managed through alternative dosing strategies or concurrent treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-754
Number of pages13
JournalAging
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • Insulin
  • Obesity
  • Rapamycin
  • mTOR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

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