Randomized double-blinded trial investigating the impact of a curriculum focused on error recognition on laparoscopic suturing training

Juliane Bingener, Tanner Boyd, Kent R Van Sickle, Inkyung Jung, Arup Saha, John Winston, Peter Lopez, Herminio Ojeda, Wayne H Schwesinger, Dimitri Anastakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Error recognition predicts technical skill. A curriculum including error recognition may improve laparoscopic suturing performance. Methods: Thirty novices were randomized into 2 groups. Each viewed an instruction videotape and underwent timed objective structured assessments of technical skills. Group A practiced the task, group B viewed an error-instruction video, practiced, followed by re-assessment. Participants counted errors on a videotape. Data were analyzed with the Fisher exact text, the Wilcoxon test, and the Kendall tau test. Results: The improvement in task time was greater in group A than in group B (P < .001). The objective structured assessments of technical skills scores improved for both groups, but did not reveal differences between the groups. Group B recognized significantly more errors than group A (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The additional error instruction showed a negative impact on performance speed, but improved cognitive error recognition. Whether visual memory overload influenced the outcome requires further examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-182
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume195
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Curriculum
Videotape Recording
Recognition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Error recognition
  • Laparoscopic suturing
  • Laparoscopy
  • Skills training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Randomized double-blinded trial investigating the impact of a curriculum focused on error recognition on laparoscopic suturing training. / Bingener, Juliane; Boyd, Tanner; Van Sickle, Kent R; Jung, Inkyung; Saha, Arup; Winston, John; Lopez, Peter; Ojeda, Herminio; Schwesinger, Wayne H; Anastakis, Dimitri.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 195, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 179-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bingener, J, Boyd, T, Van Sickle, KR, Jung, I, Saha, A, Winston, J, Lopez, P, Ojeda, H, Schwesinger, WH & Anastakis, D 2008, 'Randomized double-blinded trial investigating the impact of a curriculum focused on error recognition on laparoscopic suturing training', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 195, no. 2, pp. 179-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.11.001
Bingener, Juliane ; Boyd, Tanner ; Van Sickle, Kent R ; Jung, Inkyung ; Saha, Arup ; Winston, John ; Lopez, Peter ; Ojeda, Herminio ; Schwesinger, Wayne H ; Anastakis, Dimitri. / Randomized double-blinded trial investigating the impact of a curriculum focused on error recognition on laparoscopic suturing training. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 195, No. 2. pp. 179-182.
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