Radiographic results of augmented all-polyethylene glenoids in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss during total shoulder arthroplasty

Scott P. Stephens, Edwin E. Spencer, Michael A Wirth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Chronic osteoarthritis can result in glenohumeral subluxation and loss of posterior glenoid bone. This can alter normal glenohumeral biomechanics and affect the stress placed on the glenoid implant after total shoulder arthroplasty. This study evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of an augmented all-polyethylene glenoid for the treatment of glenoid osteoarthritis in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss and determined whether any failures or complications occurred with short-term follow-up. Methods: During a 2-year period, 21 patients were treated with an augmented glenoid for an index diagnosis of osteoarthritis with a biconcave glenoid and average posterior glenoid bone loss of 4.7 mm. Clinical outcomes were recorded for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment, Simple Shoulder Test, and active motion. Radiographic analysis included glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, component seating, ingrowth, and loosening. Results: Significant improvements were demonstrated for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment (52.3), Simple Shoulder Test (8.1), forward flexion (50), external rotation (32), and pain. Radiographic improvements were found for glenoid version (12), humeral scapular alignment (23%), and humeral glenoid alignment (8%). Central peg ingrowth was demonstrated in all patients, and complete component seating was achieved in 19 patients. No complications were encountered, and no clinical or radiographic failures were identified. Conclusion: Augmented polyethylene glenoid components demonstrated improved clinical outcome, without implant failure or complications, during short-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Polyethylene
Arthroplasty
Bone and Bones
Osteoarthritis
Elbow
Humeral Head
Shoulder Dislocation
Biomechanical Phenomena
Pain

Keywords

  • Anchor peg glenoid
  • Augmented glenoid
  • Biconcave glenoid
  • Case Series
  • Glenoid loosening
  • Glenoid retroversion
  • Level IV
  • Posterior glenoid bone loss
  • Shoulder osteoarthritis
  • Total shoulder arthroplasty
  • Treatment Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{8c2d41c98c6443d6a1de83f453acfe7c,
title = "Radiographic results of augmented all-polyethylene glenoids in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss during total shoulder arthroplasty",
abstract = "Background: Chronic osteoarthritis can result in glenohumeral subluxation and loss of posterior glenoid bone. This can alter normal glenohumeral biomechanics and affect the stress placed on the glenoid implant after total shoulder arthroplasty. This study evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of an augmented all-polyethylene glenoid for the treatment of glenoid osteoarthritis in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss and determined whether any failures or complications occurred with short-term follow-up. Methods: During a 2-year period, 21 patients were treated with an augmented glenoid for an index diagnosis of osteoarthritis with a biconcave glenoid and average posterior glenoid bone loss of 4.7 mm. Clinical outcomes were recorded for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment, Simple Shoulder Test, and active motion. Radiographic analysis included glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, component seating, ingrowth, and loosening. Results: Significant improvements were demonstrated for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment (52.3), Simple Shoulder Test (8.1), forward flexion (50), external rotation (32), and pain. Radiographic improvements were found for glenoid version (12), humeral scapular alignment (23{\%}), and humeral glenoid alignment (8{\%}). Central peg ingrowth was demonstrated in all patients, and complete component seating was achieved in 19 patients. No complications were encountered, and no clinical or radiographic failures were identified. Conclusion: Augmented polyethylene glenoid components demonstrated improved clinical outcome, without implant failure or complications, during short-term follow-up.",
keywords = "Anchor peg glenoid, Augmented glenoid, Biconcave glenoid, Case Series, Glenoid loosening, Glenoid retroversion, Level IV, Posterior glenoid bone loss, Shoulder osteoarthritis, Total shoulder arthroplasty, Treatment Study",
author = "Stephens, {Scott P.} and Spencer, {Edwin E.} and Wirth, {Michael A}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.jse.2016.09.053",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery",
issn = "1058-2746",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radiographic results of augmented all-polyethylene glenoids in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss during total shoulder arthroplasty

AU - Stephens, Scott P.

AU - Spencer, Edwin E.

AU - Wirth, Michael A

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Chronic osteoarthritis can result in glenohumeral subluxation and loss of posterior glenoid bone. This can alter normal glenohumeral biomechanics and affect the stress placed on the glenoid implant after total shoulder arthroplasty. This study evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of an augmented all-polyethylene glenoid for the treatment of glenoid osteoarthritis in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss and determined whether any failures or complications occurred with short-term follow-up. Methods: During a 2-year period, 21 patients were treated with an augmented glenoid for an index diagnosis of osteoarthritis with a biconcave glenoid and average posterior glenoid bone loss of 4.7 mm. Clinical outcomes were recorded for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment, Simple Shoulder Test, and active motion. Radiographic analysis included glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, component seating, ingrowth, and loosening. Results: Significant improvements were demonstrated for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment (52.3), Simple Shoulder Test (8.1), forward flexion (50), external rotation (32), and pain. Radiographic improvements were found for glenoid version (12), humeral scapular alignment (23%), and humeral glenoid alignment (8%). Central peg ingrowth was demonstrated in all patients, and complete component seating was achieved in 19 patients. No complications were encountered, and no clinical or radiographic failures were identified. Conclusion: Augmented polyethylene glenoid components demonstrated improved clinical outcome, without implant failure or complications, during short-term follow-up.

AB - Background: Chronic osteoarthritis can result in glenohumeral subluxation and loss of posterior glenoid bone. This can alter normal glenohumeral biomechanics and affect the stress placed on the glenoid implant after total shoulder arthroplasty. This study evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of an augmented all-polyethylene glenoid for the treatment of glenoid osteoarthritis in the presence of posterior glenoid bone loss and determined whether any failures or complications occurred with short-term follow-up. Methods: During a 2-year period, 21 patients were treated with an augmented glenoid for an index diagnosis of osteoarthritis with a biconcave glenoid and average posterior glenoid bone loss of 4.7 mm. Clinical outcomes were recorded for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment, Simple Shoulder Test, and active motion. Radiographic analysis included glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, component seating, ingrowth, and loosening. Results: Significant improvements were demonstrated for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment (52.3), Simple Shoulder Test (8.1), forward flexion (50), external rotation (32), and pain. Radiographic improvements were found for glenoid version (12), humeral scapular alignment (23%), and humeral glenoid alignment (8%). Central peg ingrowth was demonstrated in all patients, and complete component seating was achieved in 19 patients. No complications were encountered, and no clinical or radiographic failures were identified. Conclusion: Augmented polyethylene glenoid components demonstrated improved clinical outcome, without implant failure or complications, during short-term follow-up.

KW - Anchor peg glenoid

KW - Augmented glenoid

KW - Biconcave glenoid

KW - Case Series

KW - Glenoid loosening

KW - Glenoid retroversion

KW - Level IV

KW - Posterior glenoid bone loss

KW - Shoulder osteoarthritis

KW - Total shoulder arthroplasty

KW - Treatment Study

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85006970719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85006970719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jse.2016.09.053

DO - 10.1016/j.jse.2016.09.053

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

JF - Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

SN - 1058-2746

ER -