Quantifying practice effects in longitudinal research with the WISC-R and WAIS-R: A study of children and adolescents with hemophilia and male siblings without hemophilia

Patricia A. Sirois, Michael Posner, James A. Stehbens, Katherine A. Loveland, Sharon Nichols, Sharyne M. Donfield, Terece S. Bell, Suzanne D. Hill, Nancy Amodei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To quantify practice effects associated with annual administrations of WISC-R and WAIS-R in children and adolescents with and without hemophilia. Methods: Participants were young men (age: 7-19; 80 with hemophilia, 30 siblings) enrolled in the Hemophilia Growth and Development Study. Participants with hemophilia completed age-appropriate Wechsler scales at baseline and at four annual follow-ups; the siblings, at baseline and one 2-year follow-up. Regression analyses were used to quantify average changes in scores, adjusting for variables related to test performance. Results: Consecutive annual evaluations were free of significant practice effects for 4 years with the Verbal Scale and for 2 years with the Performance Scale. VIQ decreased, and PIQ increased over time. Baseline VIQ was related to changes in VIQ; baseline PIQ and number of test-specific retests were related to changes in PIQ. Conclusions: The findings support use of Wechsler scales for annual evaluations to monitor cognitive development in children and adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-131
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Chronic illness
  • Longitudinal assessment
  • Retest effects
  • Sibling comparisons
  • WAIS-R
  • WISC-R

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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