Putative Protein Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

Swetha Mahesula, Itay Raphael, David Black, Sean Leonard, Madeleine Zaehringer, Anjali B. Purkar, Jonathan A.L. Gelfond, Thomas G. Forsthuber, William E. Haskins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating neurological disease that affects approximately 2.5 million people globally (Mateen et al., 2012). Clinical diagnosis of MS, versus other similar neurological diseases, and 1 Pediatric Biochemistry Laboratory, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 2 Department of Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 3 Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 4 Department of Computer Science, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 5 High Performance Computing, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 6 RCMI Proteomics Core, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 7 RCMI Protein Biomarkers Core, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 8 Center for Interdisciplinary Health Research, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 9 Center for Research and Training in the Sciences; University of Texas at n Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249. 10 Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78229. 11 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78229. 12 Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78229. # These authors contributed equally. * Corresponding authors: WEH.scholar@gmail.com classifi cation into the following consensus defi nitions of the four major subtypes of MS, is based on a wide variety of tests (Confavreux et al., 2000; Lublin and Reingold, 1996; Noseworthy et al., 2000; Sospedra and Martin, 2005; Steinman, 1996; Thompson et al., 1997): (A) Relapsing-Remitting (RRMS), (B) Secondary Progressive (SPMS), (C) Primary Progressive (PPMS) and (D) Progressive Relapsing (PRMS). Approximately 80% of the patients initially develop the RRMS form of the disease-characterized by clinical attacks (relapses) with diverse neurological dysfunctions, followed by a full recovery or partial recovery with a residual disability. Clinical symptoms include: diffi culty walking, muscle spasms, double vision, loss of balance and incontinence. More than half of RRMS atients will eventually develop SPMS-characterized by a steady worsening of clinical symptoms, with or without attacks during the progressive phase. Less than 15% of all patients have PPMS-characterized either by steady, or by periods of slower or faster, progression of clinical worsening with no attacks. The subgroup of MS with the lowest incidence (less than 5%) is PRMS-characterized by progressive disease course with occasional relapses, with either recovery or no recovery between these attacks. A graphical overview of each of these subtypes of MS is shown in Figure 13.1A-D, adapted from (Thomson, 2006).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomarkers of Brain Injury and Neurological Disorders
PublisherCRC Press
Pages371-394
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781482239836
ISBN (Print)9781482239829
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine
  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • General Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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