Psychological adaptation and distress among HIV+ latina women: Adaptation to HIV in a Mexican American cultural context

James Alan Neff, Nancy Amodei, Smaranda Valescu, Elizabeth C. Pomeroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

In order to examine the relative importance of general individual orientations (mastery and self-esteem) and specific coping styles with regard to psychological distress among women with HIV, data are examined from a pilot study involving in-depth face-to-face interviews with 32 HIV+ Latinas receiving care at 4 clinics serving the South Texas population. Interviews were conducted to provide preliminary psychometric information on coping and distress instruments in this predominantly Mexican American population as well as to examine psychosocial factors related to individual adjustment to HIV among Latina females. Refusal rates were low in this study (approximately 10%) and measurement instruments generally had acceptable internal consistency reliability. Results of exploratory multiple regression analyses suggest that self-esteem and mastery may be more salient predictors of depression and anxiety symptoms than are specific coping strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-74
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2003

Keywords

  • Coping styles
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Latina women
  • Mastery
  • Psychological distress
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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