Psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents after severe traumatic brain injury: A controlled study

Jeffrey E. Max, Sharon L. Koele, Wilbur L. Smith, Yutaka Sato, Scott D. Lindgren, Donald A. Robin, Stephan Arndt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

110 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To study psychiatric and behavioral morbidity associated with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method: A consecutive series (n = 24) of children aged 5 through 14 years who suffered a severe TBI were matched to subjects who sustained a mild TBI and to a second matched group who sustained an orthopedic injury with no evidence of TBI. Standardized psychiatric, behavioral, and neuroimaging assessments were conducted on average 2 years after injury. Results: Severe TBI was associated with a significantly higher rate of current 'novel' psychiatric disorders (15/24; 63%) compared with children with mild TBI (5/24; 21%) and orthopedic injury (1/24; 4%). Higher effect sizes were evident for child and adolescent self-report of internalizing symptoms rather than externalizing symptoms, for parents' report of overall behavior and internalizing symptoms rather than externalizing symptoms, and for teachers' reports of overall behavior and externalizing symptoms rather than internalizing symptoms. Conclusions: Severe TBI is a profound risk factor for the development of a psychiatric disorder. Survivors should be assessed for organic personality syndrome, which is the most common psychiatric disorder after this type of injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-840
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1998

Keywords

  • Pediatrics
  • Psychopathology
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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