Proteomic analysis of the EWS-Fli-1 interactome reveals the role of the lysosome in EWS-Fli-1 turnover

David J. Elzi, Meihua Song, Kevin Hakala, Susan E Weintraub, Yuzuru Shiio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of bone and soft tissue in children that is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving EWS and an Ets family transcription factor, most commonly Fli-1. EWS-Fli-1 fusion accounts for 85% of cases. The growth and survival of Ewing sarcoma cells are critically dependent on EWS-Fli-1. A large body of evidence has established that EWS-Fli-1 functions as a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the expression of a number of genes important for cell proliferation and transformation. However, little is known about the biochemical properties of the EWS-Fli-1 protein. We undertook a series of proteomic analyses to dissect the EWS-Fli-1 interactome. Employing a proximity-dependent biotinylation technique, BioID, we identified cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CIMPR) as a protein located in the vicinity of EWS-Fli-1 within a cell. CIMPR is a cargo that mediates the delivery of lysosomal hydrolases from the trans-Golgi network to the endosome, which are subsequently transferred to the lysosomes. Further molecular cell biological analyses uncovered a role for lysosomes in the turnover of the EWS-Fli-1 protein. We demonstrate that an mTORC1 active-site inhibitor, torin 1, which stimulates the TFEB-lysosome pathway, can induce the degradation of EWS-Fli-1, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach to target EWS-Fli-1 for degradation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3783-3791
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Proteome Research
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2014

Fingerprint

Lysosomes
Proteomics
IGF Type 2 Receptor
Ewing's Sarcoma
Cations
Transcription Factors
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets
Biotinylation
trans-Golgi Network
Degradation
Bone Neoplasms
Genetic Translocation
Proteins
Endosomes
Cell proliferation
Hydrolases
Catalytic Domain
Bone
Fusion reactions
Genes

Keywords

  • Ewing sarcoma
  • EWS-Fli-1
  • interactome
  • lysosome
  • protein degradation
  • proximity-dependent biotinylation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Proteomic analysis of the EWS-Fli-1 interactome reveals the role of the lysosome in EWS-Fli-1 turnover. / Elzi, David J.; Song, Meihua; Hakala, Kevin; Weintraub, Susan E; Shiio, Yuzuru.

In: Journal of Proteome Research, Vol. 13, No. 8, 01.08.2014, p. 3783-3791.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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