Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O expression in the tumor niche correlates with reduced tumor growth, angiogenesis, circulating tumor cells and metastasis of breast cancer

Zhao Liu, Jiajie Hou, Lidong Ren, Jing He, Beicheng Sun, Lu Zhe Sun, Shui Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor in various types of cancer cells. However, little attention has been given to the role of PTPRO expression in the tumor microenvironment. We aimed to reveal the role of PTPRO in the breast cancer niche. Py8119 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted orthotopically into female wild-type or ptpro-/- C57Bl/6 mice. We observed that the loss of PTPRO in the tumor niche was correlated with larger tumor volume, more metastases, increased number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), less apoptosis and reduced necrosis rates in the orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer. The tumor microenvironment in the ptpro-/- mice also showed increased microvessel density. Moreover, an intracardiac injection mouse model was used to determine the role of PTPRO in the pre-metastatic niche. Notably, more metastases were observed in the mice of the ptpro-/- group. Taken together, PTPRO expression in the tumor niche prevents tumor growth and the formation of metastases of breast cancer, in part by attenuating tumor-associated angiogenesis and inducing the apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1908-1914
Number of pages7
JournalOncology reports
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Metastasis
  • Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O
  • Tumor growth
  • Tumor niche

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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