Prostate Cancer Screening and Disease Management: How Screening May Have an Unintended Effect on Survival and Mortality-The Camel's Nose Effect

Rhonda M. Walsh, Ian M. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Evidence suggests that men diagnosed with prostate cancer live as long as or longer than those without a diagnosis. We postulate that a reason for this paradox is increased preventive and therapeutic health care interventions following a prostate cancer diagnosis. We explored this phenomenon in patients surgically treated for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: We examined the records of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy at Audie L. Murphy Veterans Hospital between 2001 and 2004, focusing on cancer related and comorbidity data including new diagnoses, interventions and medications. Results: A total of 174 subjects had complete data for review. Of these men 72% had a change in medical regimen after diagnosis, 61% had a change in medication and 29% received a new medical diagnosis. Three men underwent cardiac catheterization and 1 had coronary bypass surgery. Conclusions: These data highlight the extent of evaluation and subsequent changes in medical treatment regimens that occur after a diagnosis of prostate cancer. Such interventions would be expected to affect survival outcomes of men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1303-1306
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume177
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Keywords

  • antitumor
  • drug screening assays
  • prostate-specific antigen
  • prostatic neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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