Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of Curriculum-Based Training for Intracorporeal Suturing and Knot Tying

Kent R Van Sickle, E. Matt Ritter, Mercedeh Baghai, Adam E. Goldenberg, Ih Ping Huang, Anthony G. Gallagher, C. Daniel Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Advanced surgical skills such as laparoscopic suturing are difficult to learn in an operating room environment. The use of simulation within a defined skills-training curriculum is attractive for instructor, trainee, and patient. This study examined the impact of a curriculum-based approach to laparoscopic suturing and knot tying. Study Design: Senior surgery residents in a university-based general surgery residency program were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive either a simulation-based laparoscopic suturing curriculum (TR group, n = 11) or standard clinical training (NR group, n = 11). During a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, placement of two consecutive intracorporeally knotted sutures was video recorded for analysis. Operative performance was assessed by two reviewers blinded to subject training status using a validated, error-based system to an interrater agreement of ≥ 80%. Performance measures assessed were time, errors, and needle manipulations, and comparisons between groups were made using an unpaired t-test. Results: Compared with NR subjects, TR subjects performed significantly faster (total time, 526 ± 189 seconds versus 790 ± 171 seconds; p < 0.004), made significantly fewer errors (total errors, 25.6 ± 9.3 versus 37.1 ± 10.2; p < 0.01), and had 35% fewer excess needle manipulations (18.5 ± 10.5 versus 27.3 ± 8.6; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Subjects who receive simulation-based training demonstrate superior intraoperative performance of a highly complex surgical skill. Integration of such skills training should become standard in a surgical residency's skills curriculum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-568
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume207
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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Curriculum
Internship and Residency
Needles
Fundoplication
Operating Rooms
Sutures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Van Sickle, K. R., Ritter, E. M., Baghai, M., Goldenberg, A. E., Huang, I. P., Gallagher, A. G., & Smith, C. D. (2008). Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of Curriculum-Based Training for Intracorporeal Suturing and Knot Tying. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 207(4), 560-568. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2008.05.007

Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of Curriculum-Based Training for Intracorporeal Suturing and Knot Tying. / Van Sickle, Kent R; Ritter, E. Matt; Baghai, Mercedeh; Goldenberg, Adam E.; Huang, Ih Ping; Gallagher, Anthony G.; Smith, C. Daniel.

In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 207, No. 4, 10.2008, p. 560-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Sickle, Kent R ; Ritter, E. Matt ; Baghai, Mercedeh ; Goldenberg, Adam E. ; Huang, Ih Ping ; Gallagher, Anthony G. ; Smith, C. Daniel. / Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of Curriculum-Based Training for Intracorporeal Suturing and Knot Tying. In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2008 ; Vol. 207, No. 4. pp. 560-568.
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