Progressive pulmonary insufficiency and other pulmonary complications of thermal injury

Basil A Pruitt, D. R. Erickson, A. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progressive pulmonary insufficiency appears to be a universal response of the lung to a variety of injuries which damage the pulmonary capillary endothelium. Persistent hyperventilation, unresponsive to the administration of oxygen, is the earliest clinical sign of this complication of trauma and should prompt close monitoring of pulmonary function (measurement of arterial blood gas and pH levels, dead space tidal volume ratio alveolar arterial oxygen difference, minute ventilation, vital capacity and inspiratory force) to assess the severity of the disease, the need for mechanical ventilatory support, and the effectiveness of treatment. Other pulmonary complications of burn injury range from carbon monoxide poisoning and narcotics overdosage in the immediate postburn period through marked hyperventilation directly related to burn size occurring in the abscence of significant parenchymal change to later occurring hematogenous and airborne pneumonia. Inhalation injury, a chemical tracheobronchitis which significantly increases the mortality of a given sized burn, may be present immediately postburn but clinically inapparent for 48-72 hr. 133Xenon lung scans permit early diagnosis of this pulmonary injury and the timely institution of a graduated therapeutic response keyed to the severity of pulmonary disability. Knowledge of the pathogenesis of each of these complications is requisite for the physician caring for burn patients and permits the employment of rational preventive and therapeutic measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-379
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume15
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1975

Fingerprint

Hot Temperature
Lung
Wounds and Injuries
Hyperventilation
Oxygen
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Narcotics
Tidal Volume
Vital Capacity
Vascular Endothelium
Lung Injury
Inhalation
Ventilation
Early Diagnosis
Pneumonia
Gases
Physicians
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Pruitt, B. A., Erickson, D. R., & Morris, A. (1975). Progressive pulmonary insufficiency and other pulmonary complications of thermal injury. Journal of Trauma, 15(5), 369-379.

Progressive pulmonary insufficiency and other pulmonary complications of thermal injury. / Pruitt, Basil A; Erickson, D. R.; Morris, A.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 15, No. 5, 1975, p. 369-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pruitt, BA, Erickson, DR & Morris, A 1975, 'Progressive pulmonary insufficiency and other pulmonary complications of thermal injury', Journal of Trauma, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 369-379.
Pruitt, Basil A ; Erickson, D. R. ; Morris, A. / Progressive pulmonary insufficiency and other pulmonary complications of thermal injury. In: Journal of Trauma. 1975 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 369-379.
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