Prior Arterial Injury Enhances Luciferase Expression Following in Vivo Gene Transfer

R. W. Barbee, D. D. Stapleton, B. D. Perry, R. N. Re, Joseph P Murgo, V. A. Valentino, J. L. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We determined the time course of gene expression following DNA/Lipofectin transfection of normal or previously injured arterial segments using direct intraluminal infusion following surgical exposure. Constructs possessing the firefly luciferase cDNA regulated by Simian virus 40, Rous sarcoma virus, or α-actin promoter were incubated together with Lipofectin for 30 minutes. Arterial segments were assayed for luciferase activity following harvest at 2-21 days. Without prior injury, luciferase activity was only 2.5-fold greater than background two days following gene transfer. Arterial injury three days before gene transfer resulted in luciferase activity 12.5-fold over background levels. This observation has clinical implications with regard to gene therapy following angioplasty, a procedure that is associated with endothelial cell denudation and smooth muscle cell proliferation. Maintenance of gene expression for several days could ameliorate the early smooth muscle migration and proliferation following arterial injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-78
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume190
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene transfer
Luciferases
Viruses
Gene expression
Muscle
Wounds and Injuries
Genes
Firefly Luciferases
Gene Expression
Rous sarcoma virus
Gene therapy
Simian virus 40
Endothelial cells
Cell proliferation
Angioplasty
Genetic Therapy
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Transfection
Smooth Muscle
Actins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Barbee, R. W., Stapleton, D. D., Perry, B. D., Re, R. N., Murgo, J. P., Valentino, V. A., & Cook, J. L. (1993). Prior Arterial Injury Enhances Luciferase Expression Following in Vivo Gene Transfer. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 190(1), 70-78. https://doi.org/10.1006/bbrc.1993.1012

Prior Arterial Injury Enhances Luciferase Expression Following in Vivo Gene Transfer. / Barbee, R. W.; Stapleton, D. D.; Perry, B. D.; Re, R. N.; Murgo, Joseph P; Valentino, V. A.; Cook, J. L.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 190, No. 1, 15.01.1993, p. 70-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barbee, RW, Stapleton, DD, Perry, BD, Re, RN, Murgo, JP, Valentino, VA & Cook, JL 1993, 'Prior Arterial Injury Enhances Luciferase Expression Following in Vivo Gene Transfer', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 190, no. 1, pp. 70-78. https://doi.org/10.1006/bbrc.1993.1012
Barbee, R. W. ; Stapleton, D. D. ; Perry, B. D. ; Re, R. N. ; Murgo, Joseph P ; Valentino, V. A. ; Cook, J. L. / Prior Arterial Injury Enhances Luciferase Expression Following in Vivo Gene Transfer. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 1993 ; Vol. 190, No. 1. pp. 70-78.
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