Primary human marrow stromal cells and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells use different mechanisms to adhere to hydroxylapatite

Krista L. Kilpadi, Amber A. Sawyer, Charles W. Prince, Pi Ling Chang, Susan L. Bellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One important step in bone formation on hard tissue implants is adhesion of osteoblast precursors to the implant surface. In this study, we used function-blocking antibodies against integrin subunits to characterize the mechanisms used by human marrow stromal cells and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells to adhere to protein-coated hydroxylapatite (HA). We found that Saos-2 use both α5-and αv-containing integrins, whereas stromal cells use αv-containing integrins but not α 5-containing integrins, despite the presence of α 5-containing integrins on cell surfaces. On the basis of this difference, we examined binding of these cell types to HA coated with fibronectin (FN) or vitronectin (VN), to determine whether these ligands for α5 and αv integrins could enhance the numbers or morphology of cells adhered to them. We also examined the adhesion of cells to HA coated with RGD peptides designed to bind to FN or VN receptors. Morphology and number of adherent stromal cells were markedly enhanced on serum-coated surfaces compared with FN or VN alone, whereas, surprisingly, Saos-2 cells failed to spread on serum-coated HA and displayed superior spreading and stress fiber formation on VN-coated HA. Collectively, these results have important implications for the design of protein coatings to enhance the performance of HA implants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-285
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume68
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteosarcoma
Durapatite
Stromal Cells
Integrins
Bone Marrow
Vitronectin
Adhesion
Proteins
Osteoblasts
Fibronectins
Antibodies
Peptides
Vitronectin Receptors
Bone
Fibronectin Receptors
Ligands
Cells
Tissue
Coatings
Stress Fibers

Keywords

  • Fibronectin
  • Hydroxylapatite
  • Integrins
  • Osteoblasts
  • Vitronectin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

Primary human marrow stromal cells and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells use different mechanisms to adhere to hydroxylapatite. / Kilpadi, Krista L.; Sawyer, Amber A.; Prince, Charles W.; Chang, Pi Ling; Bellis, Susan L.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.02.2004, p. 273-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kilpadi, Krista L. ; Sawyer, Amber A. ; Prince, Charles W. ; Chang, Pi Ling ; Bellis, Susan L. / Primary human marrow stromal cells and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells use different mechanisms to adhere to hydroxylapatite. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A. 2004 ; Vol. 68, No. 2. pp. 273-285.
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