Primary Care Interventions to Prevent Child Maltreatment: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Michael J. Barry, Wanda K. Nicholson, Michael Silverstein, David Chelmow, Tumaini Rucker Coker, Esa M. Davis, Carlos Roberto Jaén, M. Krousel-Wood, Sei Lee, Li Li, Goutham Rao, John M. Ruiz, James J. Stevermer, Joel Tsevat, Sandra Millon Underwood, Sarah Wiehe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Child maltreatment, which includes child abuse and neglect, can have profound effects on health, development, survival, and well-being throughout childhood and adulthood. The prevalence of child maltreatment in the US is uncertain and likely underestimated. In 2021, an estimated 600000 children were identified by Child Protective Services as experiencing abuse or neglect and an estimated 1820 children died of abuse and neglect. Objective: The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate benefits and harms of primary care-feasible or referable behavioral counseling interventions to prevent child maltreatment in children and adolescents younger than 18 years without signs or symptoms of maltreatment. Population: Children and adolescents younger than 18 years who do not have signs or symptoms of or known exposure to maltreatment. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to determine the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment in children and adolescents younger than 18 years without signs or symptoms of or known exposure to maltreatment. Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment. (I statement).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)951-958
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA
Volume331
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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